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THE 

QUAD 



Lebanon Valley College 



Sixth Valley Fulbright in Seven Years - 

Seep. 3 



February 5, 1982 
Volume 6, Number 8 
Annville, PA 17003 



Science Center Progressing on Schedule 




While some of us skied, or 
worked, or went to England, 
or just stayed in from the cold, 
the workmen at the Garber 
Science Center site continued 
to work on the building in 
order to finish it before 
August. 

According to Robert Snel- 
baker, Job Superintendent at 
the site, the cement for the 
roof will be poured by the end 
of the first week in February. 

Snelbaker added once the 
roof is completed at the end of 
February they will be "in the 
dry" and work will proceed 
more rapidly. 

Inside the structure, they 
have put plastic on the floor 
and they are heating the inside 
to prevent the cement from 
freezing. 



Snelbaker said the cement 
can only be poured if the tem- 
perature is above 30° for a day 
or two. 

The first floor has been par- 
titioned and they are working 
on the second floor. The third 
floor will receive a cinder 
block wall by next week if the 
temperature remains about 
30°. 

Snelbaker said that so far 
this winter they have only lost 
three days because of the 
weather. They are still on 
schedule. 

Snelbaker said as long as the 
weather holds out he hopes the 
project will be completed by 
August so the building will be 
ready for the students in time 
for the fall term. 



Weather Closes North College 



On January 17, there was a 
3'/2 hour power outage in the 
Annville area. In North 
College, the outage stopped 
the electric motor of the oil- 
fired furnace. This, and the 
fact that the heat had been set 
at about 50 degrees, caused 
five radiators to burst the next 
day, according to Frederick P. 
Sample, President of the 
College. 

Other buildings were also 
affected by the resulting drop 
ln temperature due to the 
Power loss. Blair Music Center 
suffered damage to its air-con- 
ditioning unit and humidifier, 
w hile frozen pipes cut off heat 
^ the upper level of Miller 
Chapel. 

However, North College 
a Ppears to have sustained the 



most damage. According to 
Samuel Zearfoss, head of 
LVC maintenance, the full 
extent of the damage and the 
cost of the repairs to the 
heating system will remain 
unknown until the pipes have a 
chance to thaw. Then, the 
house's entire heating system 
will be evaluated and replaced, 
probably after this semester. 

The residents of North 
College were called by Dean 
Yuhas in the latter part of the 
last week of vacation. She in- 
formed them they were to 
move into Saylor Hall by 3 
o'clock Monday afternoon. 

Although they understand 
the reasons for the move, the 
girls from North College said 
it was "a real hassle" to move 
into Saylor. They returned 



from vacation to find several 
items frozen — everything from 
shampoo to stereos. Still, the 
girls are grateful they were 
moved into another house, 
instead of being split up and 
placed in the dorms. 

The former residents of 
North College are also con- 
cerned with the possibility of 
Sample closing North College 
and Saylor, measures which 
could be taken because of low 
enrollment. "They threaten to 
move us into the dorms every 
semester," said junior 
Brenda Focht. 

When asked about this pos- 
sibility, Dean of Students 
George Marquette said, "Our 
intent is to put the heating 
system at North College back 
see North College, p. 2 



Marquette Continues Search 
For Student Activities Director 



According to Dean of Stu- 
dents George Marquette, the 
college is progressing toward 
hiring a Director of Student 
Activities by "July 1, 1982, at 
the latest." 

The position will entail "in- 
tensive involvement" with stu- 
dents in making the College 
Center the focus for recreation- 
al activities, leadership work- 
shops, and other social events, 
explained Marquette. 

When asked about the pro- 
files of possible directors, 
Marquette responded, "My 
preferred position at this time 
is that it would be someone 
with limited familiarity with 
the institution (LVC) and with 
some experience in Student 
Activities." 

President of the College 



Frederick Sample envisions 
the director "making the 
College Center an active social 
and cultural place for our stu- 
dents." Sample expects the 
director to exhibit 
"imagination and creativity 
in planning new programs. 

Marquette explained that 
the director will be responsible 
directly to him, will work full- 
time, including some evenings 
and weekends, and will 
assume the position for a com 
mitment of at least three years 

Neither Sample nor 
Marquette foresees any con- 
flicts between the director and 
Walter Smith, the director of 
the College Center. Smith will 
continue to coordinate confer 
ences, communications, and 
other activities. 



, 2 THE QUAD Friday, February 5, 1982 



THE QUAD 

Dawn Humphrey Managing Editor 

Michele DePrefontaine Copy Editor 

Mike Thomas News Editor 

Sharon Ford Features Editor 

Jed Duryea Sports Editor 

Jeff Conley Business Manager 

Rik Saltzer Advertising Manager 

Staff Writers: Vicky Bryden, Lynn Cornelius, Deb 
Dunn, David Frye, Anne Herald, Amy Hostetler, 
Kathy Kemery, Tony Lamberto, Roseann McGrath, 
Mary McNamara, Darlene Olson, Karen Reider, 
Ruth Robinson, and Mirra Yanney. 

Arthur Ford Advisor 

THE QUAD is Lebanon Valley College's bi-weekly news- 
paper, providing the college community with up-to-date 
news, sports, and ideas concerning our campus. Any student 
or faculty member wishing to contribute to THE QUAD can 
contact any staff member. 



Editorial 

On the Brighter Side . . . 



by Dawn Humphrey 

I have regularly used this space to complain about this 
school, and certain aspects of it, particularly the Administra- 
tion, and I will continue to do so because there is plenty to 
complain about, like the fact that the school seems to be 
dragging its feet in selecting a Social Director. And, the Snack 
Shop will not be redecorated or renovated until a Social 
Director is named, even though the Women's Auxiliary has 
already pledged $1,000 toward the project. Also, while the 
College pumps money into other areas, the athletic facilities 
here are sorely lacking, which affects the performance of the 
athletes and the potential physical well-being of the rest of the 
student body. 

But there is also plenty here to be proud of, like the fact 
that in the last seven years, six LVC students have won Ful- 
bright Scholarships (one of the most prestigious awards a 
college student can receive.) 

We have one of the few Actuarial Science programs east of 
the Mississippi, and an Actuarial Science professor who has 
completed five of the Actuarial Exams, which makes him one 
of approximately 50 college professors to do so. 

And the Garber Science Center, now under construction, 
will have all sorts of advanced facilities, including two green- 
houses, an electron microscope room, and an X-ray labora- 
tory. The building will unite the four science departments, 
making interdisciplinary study much easier. 

If all this sounds like one of those recruitment brochures, it 
should. Those brochures emphasize the positive aspects of the 
school— something many of us lose track of when we get ab- 
sorbed in the daily hassles of college life. 

As I said, I complain a lot about the school, but it is a very 
special place. The education offered here is comparable to or 
better than any other in this part of the state, which is evi- 
denced by the bumper crop of Fulbright scholars LVC has 
produced. 

Apparently, more people are discovering the advantages of 
this little school in the corn fields. According to Gregory 
Stanson, Admissions Director, by February 1 last year, the 
Admissions Office had received 558 completed applications. 
This year, by that date they had received 610. Admissions also 
has almost twice as many paid deposits as it did at this point 
last year. Last semester, Admissions held three Open Houses. 
According to Stanson, over half of those who attended the 
Open Houses have already applied for admission. Stanson 
says he would like to think that the new Science Center has 
something to do with the increased interest in the College. 
Although I agree with Mr. Stanson, I think there is another 
reason. 

As a result of the things I have mentioned, as well as others, 
LVC students are beginning, slowly, to develop a greater 
sense of pride in the institution, a fact which is transmitted to 
visitors. 



For years, our chief assets have been intangible. 

Chief among these intangible assets is one which no one 
seems to be able to explain— the friendly atmosphere of the 
college. With few exceptions, the students are uniformly 
friendly. Even normally non-friendly people become more 
outgoing in this atmosphere— maybe it's the occasional whiff 
of Hershey's chocolate. Whatever the reason, it makes 
everyone's days more pleasant. 

Now, maybe the Science Center will give us something con- 
crete to be proud of. 




Madam: 

Several students and faculty members, as well as the Regis- 
trar, have brought to my attention some problems that arose 
at the end of the Fall Semester. Through the efforts of the 
students, faculty, and administration, we can ensure that 
these same problems will not be repeated in the Spring 
Semester. 

The first complaint was that the Reading Period (2 days) 
was too short. The Spring Reading Period will be 3 days. 

The second complaint was that the Exam Period (4 days) 
was too short. The Spring Exam Period will be lengthened to 
5 days. 

A third complaint was that many faculty members assigned 
papers that were due during the last week of classes. I am sure 
that by so doing, the faculty wished to provide as much time 
as possible for students to complete their work. The fact that 
a paper is due the last week does not mean that it must be 
written during the last week. Students can eliminate this 
problem by working on such assignments earlier in the term. I 
will also suggest that the faculty assist student by requiring 
topics, outlines, and rough drafts to be submitted at various 
dates earlier in the semester. 

Another complaint was that some faculty members 
assigned major tests or final exams during the last week of 
class. I will consult with the assembled faculty to see if this 
practice can be eliminated. 

Yet another complaint involved the cancellation of 
scheduled final examinations. I believe that we can ensure 
that the published examination schedule will be followed. 

Since the faculty seems to share a profound concern for the 
well-being of the students, I see no reason why we cannot 
work together to keep these problems from arising again. 

Sincerely, 
Richard Reed 
Vice President and 
Dean of the Faculty 



L VC Needs Phonies 



Are you a chatterbox, or a 
bit of a ham? Do you have a 
girl friend in Oklahoma? Or is 
your heart's desire to eat 
dinner in the President's 
Dining Room? The Develop- 
ment Office wants you— to 
work on the Phon-a-thon for 
the Annual Giving Fund. 

Participants will eat dinner 
in the President's Dining 
Room with the Development 
staff, then phone alumni from 
7 to 9 p.m. to ask for dona- 
tions. At the end of each 
night's calling, workers will be 
allowed to make a free person- 
al phone call to anywhere in 
the continental United States. 
Cash and merchandise prizes 
will also be awarded to 
workers. 



Students will phone from 
the College Center during the 
weeks of February 8, 15, and 
23, and March 1. To register, 
students should contact 
Preston Hadley, Assistant 
Director of Development, at 
Ext. 222, or Joe Wengyn in 
Hammond 205. Wengyn is the 
Student Chairman of the 
Phon-a-thon. 

Hadley points out that 
"about 20% of a person's 
education at Valley is covered 
by gifts and grants." This year, 
Hadley estimates that the 
callers, who will include 
alumni as well as students, will 
make about 5,000 calls. This 
year's Alumni Giving goal is 
$160,000. 



LV Students 
Chosen For 

Who's Who 



The following students have 
been named to Who's Who in 
American Colleges and 
Universities: Denise Louise 
Achey, Kenneth W. Breiten- 
stein, Colleen Ann Crammer, 
Tracy Lynn Daniel, Scott 
Myles Dallas, Merike Jeanne 
Evans, Richard Allen Gates, 
Michael Fred Gross, Glenn 
Allen Hafer, Kimberly Ross 
Hillman, William Michael 
Loffredo, Roseann Madeline 
McGrath, Robert Alan Neu- 
bert, Carol Sue Nixon, Evelyn 
Hannah Pickering, Delight 
Lorraine Reiner, Daniel Allen 
Reppert, Ernest Todd 
Richardson, Victoria Lynn 
Shaw, Barbara Jan Strock, 
Elizabeth Yao-Hwa Sung, 
Linda Lee Texter, ^ Joseph 
Peter Wengyn, and Marguer- 
ite Cecelia Woodland. 



January Grads 
Get Diplomas 



Lebanon Valley College 
held its Winter Commence- 
ment Service on Sunday, Jan- 
uary 24, 1982. Dr. Carolyn 
Hanes of the Sociology de- 
partment addressed the 
graduating students. The 
students receiving degrees 
were: Sara Louise Moran 
Aker; Polly Koontz 
Barndollar; Douglas Arthur 
Bufton; Richard Elvin Fritsch; 
Michael David Godynick; 
Janet Marie Huber; Anne 
Rebecca Krall; Martin Donald 
Lane; Robert Alan Neubert, 
Cum Laude; Rebecca Jean 
Newcomb, Cum Laude; Carol 
Sue Nixon, Summa Cum 
Laude; Tamela Lee Oliver; 
Joan Louise Richwine, 
Summa Cum Laude; Gloria 
Bradley Santoni; Charles 
Robert Sapp, Judith Leibfried 
Strickler; and Glenn Robert 
Swavely. 

North College - com. from p.l 

into shape... The closing of 
North College has not been 
intimated." 

Sample said, "We would 
prefer to have North College 
open (rather than Saylor) be- 
cause of the recent exterior 
work. I do not foresee closing 
both houses." Sample added 
that he hopes to have a higher 
enrollment next year, which 
would mean that both houses 
would be open. 



Friday, February 5, 1982 pg , 3 THE QUAD 




Mike Gross 



PHONE - ANNVILLE 867-2851 

MAX LOVE'S 

CHARLES MESSIMER, Prop. 
CLEANING & PRESSING 

PLANT AND STORE 

147 W. Main St. Annville, Pa. 




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AAA Service 
State Inspection 

Mon. thru Fri. 8*5; 
Sat. 8-12 



Gross A warded Fulbright 



On January 18 Michael 
Gross, a senior Biology and 
Accounting double major, re- 
ceived word from Dean of Stu- 
dents George Marquette, that 
he has been awarded a Ful- 
bright Grant. 

The grant, a prestigious 
award obtained by six LVC 
students in the past seven 
years, is awarded by the Insti- 
tute of International Educa- 
tion after a rigorous 
application and screening 
process. 

Gross said he was originally 
inspired to apply for the grant 
because of Daniel Koon, a 
recent Fulbright scholar from 
LVC who was Gross's 
neighbor at college. 

Last April, Biology 
Department Chairman, Dr. 
Paul Wolf, also began encour- 
aging Gross to apply. 

Gross decided to combine 



his talents in French and his 
major in Biology. He applied 
for a grant to study revegeta- 
tion of marshland in a section 
of France badly damaged by 
an oil spill. 

After consultation with 
Marquette, Wolf, and mathe- 
matics professor, William 
Fleischman, Gross went 
through a screening process 
which included a Campus 
Committee Evaluation. The 
committee, comprised of 
administration members and 
faculty members from various 
departments evaluated the 
academic qualifications of the 
applicant, the validity and 
feasibility of his proposed pro- 
ject, his language qualifica- 
tions, his knowledge of 
France, and his level of matur- 
ity, motivation and adaptabil- 
ity to a different cultural en- 
vironment. The group also 



evaluated the impression the 
candidate will make abroad as 
a citizen representing the 
United States. 

Gross received a grant 
which will last from October, 
1982 through June, 1983. He 
plans to travel to France and 
follow up on investigations 
and experiments surrounding 
the Amoco Cadiz oil spill of 
March, 1978, the largest oil 
spill in history, "which spoiled 
over 200 miles of French salt 
marshes and beaches," accor- 
ding to Gross. 

When asked about his initial 
reaction to receiving the grant, 
Gross said he was surprised 
that he was notified of the 
results so quickly. He added 
that the administration and 
the faculty greatly encouraged 
his efforts. 

After working abroad, 
Gross hopes to do graduate 
work at Cornell University. 



VALLEY VOICES 



The Quad recently asked a 
random sample of faculty and 
students the question: "What 
did you do over Christmas 
Break?" 



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Fri-Sat, 11-1, Sun, 12-1 



spent the whole time with 
someone I love ... catered a 
wedding reception ... worked 
in a nursing home, spent the 
time with friends, read, 
watched TV, threw a New 
Year's Eve party ... goofed off 
... watched football (New 
York Giants) ... watched foot- 
ball (Philadelphia Eagles) ... 
built a garage ... slept ... slept 
and ate ... slept, ate and drank 
... worked in a nursing home 
... went to parties, went skiing 
... went shopping, stayed in 
the mountains ... went to a 
Police and GoGos concert in 
Philadelphia ... Florida was 
great and warm! ... saw old 



friends and Ed ... went to 
England and loved it ... went 
to Florida and laid out in 50 
degree weather ... consumed 
mass quantities of liquid sus- 
tenance in Ohio and Virginia, 
had relations with Indian reser- 
vations, and thought of ways 
to torture more cats ... worked 
at Wendy's ... found that 
there is damn good beer in 
England ... worked, slept, and 
visited Pumpkin ... slept and 
went to Moose's ... ate a lot of 
real food, used a lot of soft 
toilet paper, shot my neigh- 
bor's dog, thought about Scio- 
to ville, and said, "Freeze 
gopher." 



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Pg. 4 



THE QUAD Friday, February 5, 1982 



Notes From England 



by Vicky Bryden 

Turkey Hill Market, 

Annville, PA 

Dec. 29, 1981, 11:00a.m. 

Eight people affiliated with 
or attending LVC were assem- 
bling here — not to buy a quart 
of milk or brownie mix — but 
to embark on a journey that 
would end on the other side of 
the Atlantic Ocean— London, 
England. 

It was a cold, windy day, but 
most of us didn't notice. I've 
never been so excited to go to 
Turkey Hill before! We (Mr. 
Glenn Woods of the English 
Dept. and his daughter, Julia 
Woods, Bill Moore, Glenn 
Hoffman, Pat Gering, Diane 
Baumgardner, and myself) 
met Dr. Philip Billings of the 
English Dept., coordinator of 
the trip, at Turkey Hill. We 
took a limousine van from 
Annville to Kennedy Airport 
in New York. Once there, we 
met the rest of our crew: 
Nancy Locker, Nicole Fox, 
Leslie Engesser, Veronica De- 



vitz, Paul Rusen, and Laura 
Matzko. 

The flight was smooth, but 
we were literally packed in like 
sardines. We landed at Heath- 
row Airport, just outside of 
London. After we got to our 
hotel, most of us slept. Our 
bodies said it was about 
4:00 a.m. when we arrived at 
the hotel at 9:00 a.m., London 
time. Jet lag— argh! Who ever 
"invented" such a "bloody" 
awful thing?! Some of us went 
to Piccadilly Circus. 
Dec. 30— After an English 
breakfast of jelly, rolls and tea 
(I drank tea over there like it 
was going out of style!), we all 
went to Kensington Park. The 
weather was much warmer 
than I had anticipated (40°- 
50 °F). Kensington Park, 
which is next to Hyde Park 
and Green Park, is clean and 
green, scattered with huge oak 
and beech trees. At this early 
morning hour, Englishmen 
were out walking their dogs, 



who looked just as proper as 
their masters did. They (the 
masters) carried umbrellas and 
were clad in trench coats 
which probably covered tweed 
suits. They have a distinct air 
about themselves. That is, 
they are very private and they 
respect others' privacy. Yet, I 
can't help but think that their 
stern faces are just a thin layer 
covering a great deal of jovial- 
ity just waiting to come out. 
Jan. 2 — After an English 
breakfast of jelly, rolls and tea 
(bread and tea turned out to be 
a main staple in many of our 
diets!), we went to Cambridge. 
Traveling by bus, we got our 
first view of the pastoral 
English countryside. The 
rolling, grassy hills were 
patchworked by the natural 
hedgerows. It seemed every- 
where you looked there were 
sheep grazing! 

Even though it rained the 
whole time we were at Cam- 
bridge, I loved it. We were 



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8:30 AM -4:00 PM Friday 




A clock tower in Canterbury 



guided through the famous 
colleges by a cheery Scottish 
woman. We saw architect 
Christopher Wren's first 
chapel. We also caught a 
glimpse of the Eagle Pub 
where Watson and Crick were 
supposed to have put together 
the double helix puzzle. We 
went through Pembroke, 



Trinity and Kings Colleges. 
The city was filled with little 
shops of all kinds and there 
was a huge tented market in the 
square. After the tour, we ate 
at a pub and went bargain 
hunting. I got "lost" in a 
marvelous musty old 
bookstore. 

(to be continued in the next issue) 



ANNVILLE OFFICE 




Lebanon Valley 

National Bank 



Member F.D.I.C. 



BOB'S Family Hairstyles 

35 E. Main St., Annville 867-2557 

Women's Precision Haircut $3.00 

Women's Shampoo, Cut, Style $5.00 

Men's Precision Haircut $2.50 

Men's Shampoo, Cut, Style $3.50 

Helene Curtis Permanent Wave $13.00 

(Includes cut & style) 

Frosting, Shampoo, Style $12.50 

Shampoo, Set or Blow Style $2.50 

HOURS 

Mon., Wed., Thurs., Fri. — 1 p.m. to 7 p.m. 
Sat. 9 a.m. to 12 noon Closed Tusday 
Appointment or Walk-In 



Friday, February 5, 1982 



An Occasional Comment 



There probably are not too 
many people at LVC who 
don't appreciate their mail. 
Since Annville is not exactly 
the most thriving metropolis, 
we depend on mail to connect 
us to the real and exciting 
worlds of our outside friends. 
The only problem with mail is 
that it is as rare as short lines in 
the cafeteria. 

Many of us shamefully 
admit that we are victims of 
the "air-mail syndrome"; our 
boxes are full of nothing but 
air. Innocent victims of the 
air-mail syndrome can be iden- 
tified by their excessive opti- 
mism, by their outstanding 
athletic abilities, and most of 
all, by their runny noses. 

Optimism causes them to 
check their boxes twice each 
day, even on Sundays; these 
people never give up hope. 
Their athletic abilities are 
sharpened by their frequent 
100-yard dashes to their mail 
boxes, and their bull-dozing 
the other students in the hall- 
ways; their fingers are strone 



by Sharon Ford 

from opening the boxes, some- 
times without key or combina- 
tion. 

Their runny noses are the 
result of what they discover in 
their boxes, nothing but air. 

As of now, no one has dis- 
covered a perfect solution to 
the air-mail syndrome. But if 
an empty box leaves an empty 
feeling, there are a few alter- 
natives. A few Valley students 
manage to keep their boxes 
full of junk- mail, catalogues, 
and free samples. Although 
this type of paraphenalia can 
be annoying, it looks nicer 
than air. 

By sending away for just 
one 88 cent item from 
Spencer's catalogue, their 
names are put on every 
mailing list from Annville to 
Walla-Walla. 

But if junk-mail does not 
satisfy mail hunger-pangs, 
relax and enjoy. Remember 
that an empty box doesn't just 
mean a lack of letters, it also 
means a lack of bills. 



Crossword Puzzle 



by Joe Bonacquisti 

ACROSS 

1. Edible mollusks 

5. Gaudy 
10. Malicious stare 
12. Throbbing pain 

14. Green, red, or blue-green marine plant 

16. Europium (chemical symbol) 

17. One 

18. Religious speech 

20. Dash quickly 

21. Observe 

22. Bought (abbr.) 

23. Chemical symbol for the fifty-second 
element 

24. Occurs during dreams 
26. Solo melody 

29. Black and white cookie 

31. Food for an aardvark 

33. Old English (abbr.) 

35. A light late-afternoon meal for the British 

37. Behold 

38. Cry from a lamb 

40. Capable 

41. Demonstrative pronoun 

43. Noun modifier (abbr.l 

44. 0.454 Kilograms (abbr.) 

45. Every floor of every dorm has at least one 
of these 

47. A curved line 

48. Rock group 

49. Learned 

51. Slowest mammal 

52. Can be lost in rage 

53. The extent of the mind's grasp 




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DOWN 



1. Miniature alligator 

2. One voung woman (two words) 

3. A confused fight among a crowd 

4. To isolate from others 

6. Sixth note of the diatonic scale 

7. Single spotted card 

8. Horrified tremble 

9. Him 

ll. Depictor of Aries 

13. To put on record 

15. The oldest known stone implement used 

by pre-historic man 

17. Skill 

19. The 14th letter of the English alphabet 

22. A pachyderm's trunk 



25. 1 

27. Chemical symbol for the element studied 
by Marie Curie 

28. Temporary 

30. Australian Teddy Bear 
32. Coax with flattery 
34. The reflux of tide-water 

36. Near 

37. Italian monetary unit 

38. The legal profession 

39. A cool drink 

42. An exclamation of surprise 
46. Poisonous snake 

49. Us 

50. Suffix designating one in a specified 
condition 



CITY 
LIMITS 

200 W. Main St. 
Annville 

Good Food, Cold Beer 

867-9971 




Services tor the 

entire family 
109 W. Main St. 
Annville, PA 
Jean C. Bomgardner 
867-2985 



Harpers 
Tavern 

comer Rt. 934 & Rt. 22 

Fine Dining 

Hours — 5:00- 10:00 p.m. 

Bar — 5:00 - 12:00 midnight 
Reservations Call 

865-9357 

after 3:30 p.m. ask for Elaine 

Banquet Facilties Available 
Closed Sunday and Monday 



pg. 6 THE QUAD Friday, February 5, 1982 




Favorite Course - Despite the weather, Valley students have been running on Maple Street, 
one of their favorite courses. Joel Ronco (left) and Paul Jutting (right) are getting into 
^£wpefbrjact^^ 

Dutchmen Drop Last 5 of 6 

Valley Basketball Struggling 



"At the beginning of the 
season my goal was to achieve 
a .500 or better record," said 
coach Fran Satalin. The 
chances of meeting that goal 
now, however, are not as good 
as they were at the beginning 
of the season. 

The Dutchmen are now at 6 
and 9, after dropping their last 
five of six games. Their only 
recent win was a convincing 
effort against Gettysburg 82- 
71 at Gettysburg , Jan. 23. The 
Valley hit on 26 of 32 free 
throws with Greg Goodwin 



could manage only six points, 
and Gary Freysinger leading 
the Dutchmen scorers with 24 
and 21 respectively. 

Last Saturday night in 
Lynch Gym the story was 
turned around. Freysinger sat 
out the entire game with an in- 
jured thigh, and Goodwin 

Despite sluggish play 
throughout the game, the 
Valley still had a chance to win 
when Bob Johnston, who led 
all scorers with 19, hit three 
straight jump shots to bring 
the Dutchmen to within four 



points. Scott Mailen then hit 
four points to tie the game 
with four minutes left. 

The Greyhounds then 
regrouped, hitting eight of 
nine free throws to win 65-59. 

Satalin feels that a major 
reason for this inconsistency is 
the inexperience of three of his 
starters, coupled with what 
Satalin termed a "too-slow de- 
fense." 

The Valley takes on Allen- 
town Thursday night, Dickin- 
son Saturday night and Eliza- 
bethtown next Monday night, 
all at home. 



Wrestlers Return Strong After Break 



With much hard work over 
the semester break and the 
addition of two wrestlers, the 
LVC wrestling team has 
achieved a strong record of 7- 
2, its best in years. 

"The key to our winning is 
that the team stayed in shape 
over vacation," said coach 
Gerald Petrofes. "They came 
back ready to wrestle and it's 
some of the best wrestling I 
have seen." 

Most recently the team 
traveled to Scranton to partici- 
pate in a quad match. LVC 
came away as the overall 
winner by defeating Swarth- 
more 36-9, Muhlenburg 
39-9 and Scranton 32-9. 

"This was our best effort all 
year; we were strong through 
all 30 matches," said Petrofes. 

The addition of wrestlers 
Jerry Ryan and Al Puketza 
has helped the team greatly. 



Petrofes said both wrestlers 
are a pleasant surprise. "These 
guys are scrappy and very 
strong; they have really made 
an impact upon our season," 
said Petrofes. 

The stongest performer for 
Lebanon Valley is freshman 
Mike Ressor whose present 
record stands at 23-0 through 
tournament and regular 
season matches. Most of the 
wrestlers on the team have 
winning records. Mike 
LaPorta is 8-1, Glen Stein- 
muller 6-1 and Wayne Meyer 
is 7-2. 

The team's most recent vic- 
tories were won convincingly, 
which is how they hope to 
finish the season, "We're ex- 
tremely shallow at many weight 
classes, but as long as we stay 
healthy, this season could be 
one of our best," Petrofes 
said. 



The toughest opponents 
that remain for LVC are 
Gettysburg and Ursinus. 



WANTED 

The Easter Seal 
Society is in need of 
individuals to work 
with handicapped 
Men and Boys from 
June 15 to August 13 

*Salary *Room 
* Board *Laundry 

For. Further Details, 
Contact: 

Director of Recreation & Camping 
The Pennsylvania Easter Seal Society 
P.O. Box 497 
Middletown, PA 17057-0497 
Telephone: (717) 939-7801 



Women Still Hopeful; 
Coach Eyes Improvement 



Under the direction of first 
year head coach Jim Smith, 
the LVC women's basketball 
team has a record of three 
losses and no wins. 

Their last game was a 
December 7 loss to Dickinson. 

They spent the entire Christ- 
mas break without a practice 
and started to prepare for their 
first game of the second 
semester, against powerful 
Franklin and Marshall, on 
January 24. Coach Smith feels 
that the long layoff will hurt 
the team both mentally and 
physically. 

Because the established 
teams in the MAC play more 
polished basketball than the 
younger Flying Dutchmen, 
Smith has set the team goal as 
improvement. "We have a 
good shot at knocking off 
Eastern or Wilson, and if we 
improve in our games with the 
MAC teams I will be 
satisfied," Smith said. Smith 
further pointed out that the 



team has excellent enthusiasm 
and is very eager for their first 
victory. 

Smith feels that the reason 
for the winless season is the in- 
experience of the team; there 
are 1 1 players on the team and 
only two of them have pre- 
vious high school basketball 
experience. These two are "the 
ones to watch," according to 
Smith; they are Karen Reider 
and Dorothy Halbleib. 

The atmosphere at the prac- 
tices is relaxed but 
cooperative. According to 
Smith, the girls are energetic, 
and are slowly picking up the 
fundamentals. 

Coach Smith would like to 
do more recruiting and also 
hopes to increase the number 
of games on the schedule. Sta- 
tistically the team is doing 
better than last year's team, 
and with recruiting and experi- 
ence Smith believes the team 
should be competitive in the 
MAC in a couple of years. 



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Phone 867-1671 



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THE 

QUAD 



Lebanon Valley College 



Wrestling Milestone Reached - 



February 19, 1982 
Volume 6, Number 9 
Annville, PA 17003 



Hi 



Admissions Data Mixed 



by David Frye 

Dean of Admissions Greg- 
ory G. Stanson remains "cau- 
tiously optimistic" about the 
College's recruiting activities 
for the 1982-1983 academic 
year. He reflected this mood in 
a memorandum sent to faculty 
and administrators on 
February 3, 1982. 

The memo contains a brief 
statistical breakdown of the 
Office of Admissions' 
recruiting through February 1 , 
1982. The first section con- 
tains figures on four types of 
contact between the College 
and prospective students: in- 
quiries, staff visits, group 
visits, and on-campus inter- 
views. 

Stanson feels most enthusi- 
astic about the increase in on- 
campus interviews. He noted 



that this type of contact pro- 
vides the most personal en- 
counter between the College 
and the prospective student. 

The favorable increases in 
on-campus interviews are fur- 
ther reflected in the totals for 
completed applications. As of 
February 1, 1982, 609 applica- 
tions have been completed and 
returned to the College, an in- 
crease of 9.1% over one year 
ago, and an increase of 8.0% 
over two years ago. 

Total cumulative accep- 
tances, however, are down 
compared to the past two 
years. The 272 acceptances as 
of February 1, 1982 represent 
a 4.9% decline since last year, 
and a 20% drop since two 
years ago. 

Stanson attributes this 



Parents' Weekend Scheduled 



Saturday, Feb. 20, 1982 

Registration— The Dept. Chairmen will be 
there to assist. 
Coffee hour 

President Sample, Career Placement Director 
Dave Evans and Deans Marquette and Yuhas 
will have a question and answer session in the 
Little Theater. 

LVC Jazz Band will perform in Lutz Hall. 
Lunch 

Music Program in Blair Music Center. 
One Act Plays in the Little Theater. 
Buffet 

Movie — The Four Seasons 

I arsity Basketball — LVC plays Franklin and 

Marshall College. 

Reception for parents and students in East 

Dining Room. 

^>nday, Feb. 21, 1982 

Worship Service in the Chapel 

Dinner 

Senior Recital — Darlene Miller, Soprano in 

° J air Music Center 

One Act Plavs in the Little Theater. 



9:00 a.m. 

9:00-9:30 
9:40-10:45 



11:00-11:30 
Lunch 
1:00 
2:15 
5:00 
8:00 
8:00 

10:30 



10:30 a.m. 
12:00 
3:00 

8:00 



decline in acceptances to the 
bad winter weather, which 
often closes down secondary 
schools and slows the process 
of acceptance. He expects the 
number of acceptances to pick 
up in the next several months. 

Stanson's memo does not 
include figures for its out- 
going correspondence, an area 
documented in the Report of 
the SELF-STUDY of LEBA- 
NON VALLEY COLLEGE. 
By September 1, 1978, out- 
going correspondence totalled 
40,822 pieces. Three years 
later, the Office of Admissions 
mailed out 72,288 pieces of 
correspondence by September 
1. 

Despite this 77% increase in 
outgoing correspondence, the 
school has experienced a 12.3% 
decline in new enrollments, 
from 300 in 1978 to 263 in 
1981. 

A disheartening trend be- 
comes apparent when the rate 
of enrollment per outgoing 
correspondence is calculated 
for the past six years. The rate 
was 0.64% in 1976, 0.65% in 
1977, 0.73% in 1978, 0.64% in 
1979, 0.46% in 1980, and only 
0.36% in 1981. 

This year, the Office of Ad- 
missions consolidated much of 
its clerical work by beginning 
to use the College's computer. 
This allows Stanson to "save 
hundreds of hours" and to 
"better serve our prospective 
students," he noted. The 
computer will also allow the 
Office of Admissions to 
further escalate the number of 
outgoing correspondences 
needed to attain full 
enrollment. 

Speaking about the efforts 
of the Office of Admissions, 
Stanson feels "very positive" 
about the College's ability to 
see Admissions, p. 2 




Horace W. Tousley 



Horace Tousley Named 
As Department Chairman 



by Mike Thomas 

Last Wednesday, February 
10, Horace W. Tousley, instruc- 
tor in mathematical sciences at 
LVC, accepted the position of 
chairman of that department. 

Tousley plans to work close- 
ly with the rest of the depart- 
ment members, and in a brief 
interview, he noted that no 
major changes are planned for 
the department. 

Tousley added that he is 
pleased to accept the position 
as chairman, and he feels he 
can do "an appropriate job 
under the circumstances." 

Tousley has previously served 
in an operations research posi- 
tion with the U.S. Army. Prior 
to his position in operations 
research, Tousley worked as a 
logistician for the Army from 
1955 to 1981. 

He has held teaching posi- 



tions at the University of Ala- 
bama and West Point. A 1951 
graduate of Ripon College 
with the A.B. degree in mathe- 
matics, Tousley earned the 
M.S. I.E. degree in operations 
research from the University 
of Alabama in 1970. He received 
degrees from the U.S. Army 
Command and General Staff 
College and U.S. Army War 
College. 

Tousley served in the U.S. 
Navy from 1946 to 1948 and 
the U.S. Army from 1951 to 
1981. His professional member- 
ships include the Mathematical 
Association of America and 
the Operations Research 
Society of America. 

A resident of New Cumber- 
land PA, Tousley hopes to 
move closer to LVC in the 
near future. 



/ 



pg-2 THE OUAD Friday, February 19, 1982 



THE QUAD 

Dawn Humphrey Managing Editor 

Michele DePrefontaine Copy Editor 

Mike Thomas News Editor 

Sharon Ford Features Editor 

Jed Duryea Sports Editor 

Jeff Conley Business Manager 

Rik Saltzer Advertising Manager 

Staff Writers: Vicky Bryden, Lynn Cornelius, Deb 
Dunn, David Frye, Anne Herald, Amy Hostetler, 
Kathy Kemery, Tony Lamberto, Roseann McGrath, 
Mary McNamara, Darlene Olson, Karen Reider, 
Ruth Robinson, and Mirra Yanney. 

Arthur Ford Advisor 

THE QUAD is Lebanon Valley College's bi-weekly news- 
paper, providing the college community with up-to-date 
news, sports, and ideas concerning our campus. Any student 
or faculty member wishing to contribute to THE QUAD can 
contact any staff member. 



Editorial 

Senior Dinner: Low Blow 

by Dawn Humphrey 

This year's Senior Dinner, originally scheduled for May 14 
at the Lebanon Treadway Inn, has been cancelled. 

Asked about the cancellation, President Sample cited sever- 
al reasons for the demise of the event, including the "jam- 
ming up of activities" toward the end of the school year, and 
the "pinch on dollars." But the fundamental reason, he said, 
was the Administration's decision to put the money normally 
spent on the dinner into the Career Planning and Placement 
Office. 

Sample said, "All of the seniors with whom I've spoken are 
well pleased with the upgrading of Career Planning and 
Placement. I think everyone appreciates that having a higher 
priority." 

Yes, but at the expense of a Senior Dinner? Not all of the 
seniors are as pleased about the move as the President is. 

As an appeasement, Sample is placing more emphasis on 
his dinners with small groups of seniors in the President's 
Dining Room which have been held for the past 14 years. 
Sample says this year they have added a few frills, including 
salads and appetizers. But according to Mr. David Michaels, 
Food Service Director, since he took over the Food Service 
operations last January, all meals in the President's Dining 
Room have been served the same way — with table linens, 
appetizers, tossed salads, desserts, and what he calls "suit- 
able" entrees. Maybe the President is a little confused. 

However, he is right about one thing; the series of small 
dinners is less expensive than one big dinner (Michaels esti- 
mates that the school could have over 75 of the smaller 
dinners for the cost of one big dinner). Plus, Michaels notes, 
the money is being pumped back into the school, instead of 
being spent outside. 

From an economic standpoint, the President's move seems 
understandable, but he shouldn't pretend he's doing the 
seniors a big favor. Many, if not most of them, don't want to 
eat with him in that setting. They accept the invitation out of 
a sense of obligation. The seniors feel stifled by the stale con- 
versation and the prepared "ice-breaker" questions the Presi- 
dent asks. Also, at a school which prides itself on a small 
friendly atmosphere, many are discouraged by the fact that, 
although they are seniors the President has no idea of who 
they are. Often, all he knows about them is what is written on 
an index card in front of him. 

If the President insists on having these little dinner parties, 
he might at least try to make them more interesting. Perhaps 
he could invite a group of seniors from a particular major, 
along with their department chairperson. That way, he might 
gather some useful knowledge and suggestions about that 
specific area of the college. Also, the guests would probably 
know each other, which would make everyone more comfort- 
able and the conversation more meaningful. 

No matter what changes are made, however, they will not 
affect this year's seniors. They have been dealt a low blow by 
the college. Once the dinner was scheduled, it should not have 



been cancelled. With a budget of about $8 million, the few 
thousand dollars the event would have cost could not have 
made that big of an impact. But the college will feel the 
impact of the decision when it tries to get the Class of 1982 to 
donate their $50 contingency fees to the school, and later 
when it asks for donations to the Annual Giving Fund. This 
looks like another of the Administration's "penny wise, 
pound foolish" moves. 

\NEWSNOTES\ 

/. Heffner Publishes Article 



An article by John H. Heff- 
ner, associate professor of 
philosophy, has been published 
in the most recent issue of In- 
ternational Philosophical 
Quarterly. Heffner's paper, 
entitled "The Casual Theory 
of Visual Perception: Its 
Scientific Basis and Epistemo- 
logical Implications," is a 
study of how philosphical 
issues related to perception are 
connected with experimental 
work. 

John Heffner joined the 



LVC faculty in 1972 as an in- 
structor in philosophy. Prior 
to accepting the position he 
was a teaching fellow at 
Boston University from 1968 
to 1972. 

Heffner received the B.S. 
degree in physics from 
Lebanon Valley College in 
1968. He also attended the 
University of Edinburgh and 
Boston University, where he 
was awarded both the A.M. 
degree and Ph.D. degree in 
philosophy. 



Geffen Chosen PHA President 



Elizabeth Geffen, professor 
of history and chairman of the 
History and Political Science 
Department of Lebanon 
Valley College, has been elected 
president of the Pennsylvania 
Historical Association, the 
only state-wide historical society 
in the state. Geffen is the first 
woman to hold the position of 
president. 

A graduate of the University 
of Pennsylvania School of 
Education with the B.S. 
degree in English, Geffen also 
earned the M.A. and Ph.D. 
degrees from the university. 
Prior to joining the LVC faculty 
in 1958, she worked as an ad- 



ministrative assistant in the 
President's Office at the 
University of Pennsylvania 
and as an editorial assistant 
for VOGUE MAGAZINE. 

Geffen holds memberships 
in numerous historical organi- 
zations including The Fellows 
in American Studies, the His- 
torical Society of Pennsylvania, 
the Organization of American 
Historians, the Lebanon County 
Historical Society, and the 
Friends of Old Annville to 
name a few. She has had several 
articles and books published. 

A native of Philadelphia, 
Elizabeth Geffen resides in 
Annville. 



Spoons Missing 
From Cafeteria 



Since the beginning of the 
year, LVC Food Service has 
lost approximately 800 
spoons, according to Mr. 
David Michaels, director of 
Food Service. 

LVC Food Service had 
about 1000 spoons at the 
beginning of last semester. An 
inventory taken over Winter 
Break showed only about 500 
spoons remaining. Since the 
beginning of this semester, 
Michaels claims, 216 spoons 
have been taken — an average 
of about 10 per day. 

Michaels plans "to remedy 
the immediate problem by 
purchasing less expensive 
spoons and, later, look into 
ordering more expensive 
spoons that match the rest of 
the silverware." 

Meanwhile, Michaels points 
out that using disposable 
spoons is expensive. The 
shortage is currently forcing 
Food Service to spend about 
$18 a day on plastic spoons. 

Replacing the spoons will 
also be costly. The price of a 
spoon is 62.5 cents, which 
"costs more than some of the 
entrees I buy," noted 
Michaels. 

The cost of replacing the 
spoons will come from the 
money the Food Service has 
set aside for the loss or break- 
age of dishes. "This just cuts 
into our budget a little more," 
Michaels commented. 

Finally, Michaels is request- 
ing that any dishes or silver- 
ware which students might 
have in their rooms, be 
returned. Michaels noted, 
"No questions will be asked if 
a student returns silverware." 



Admissions - com. from p. l 

recruit a strong and diversified 
academic class. 

As in the past, the Presiden- 
tial Scholarship Program "re- 
mains one of the College's 
prime recruiting programs," 
Stanson comments in the 
memo. On February 6, 1982, 
59 scholars out of 63 regis- 
trants appeared and competed 
for the $1000 to $2000 per year 
awards. 

Stanson plans to ask faculty 
and administrators to aid in 
telephoning or writing to stu- 
dents who have received ac- 
ceptance letters from L.V.C. 

Current students, too, will 
have a chance to help recruit 
next year's entering class. The 
Office of Admissions will con- 
duct a Phon-a-thon in the 
College Center during the 
weeks of March 15 and March 
22. In addition, students may 



volunteer to take part in the 
new Host-Hostess Program, 
allowing prospective students 
to experience college life from 
inside. 

Besides these programs, 
Stanson uses the Garber 
Science Center and the unin- 
creased tuition and fees as 
drawing cards. 

Nevertheless, several exter- 
nal factors essentially beyond 
the College's control hamper 
Stanson 's efforts to increase 
enrollment. Stanson says the 
effects of cut-backs in federal 
financial support of students 
are "intangible," yet real. The 
high cost of attending college 
and the difficulty in paying for 
it cause some prospective stu- 
dents to decline enrolling at 
L.V.C. 

Stanson feels "cautiously 
optimistic" that the Office of 
Admissions will be able to 
succeed in recruiting enough 



students for next year. He 
observes that both alumni and 
present students are becoming 
more aware of the importance 
of preserving the College's sta- 
bility through full enrollment. 

Poetry Contest 

A $1,000 grand prize will be 
awarded in the upcoming 
poetry competition sponsored 
by World of Poetry, a 
quarterly newsletter for poets. 

Poems of all styles and on 
any subject are eligible to 
compete for the grand prize or 
for 99 other cash or merchan- 
dise awards, totaling over 
$10,000. 

Rules and official entry 
forms are available from the 
World of Poetry, 2431 
Stockton Blvd., Dept. A 
Sacramento, California 
95817. 



pg. 3 THE QUAD Friday, February 19, 1982 



Faculty Team Victorious 
In 2nd Annual Quiz Bowl 



Crossword Puzzle 



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by Amy Hosteller 

After a shaky start, the LVC 
Quiz Bowl faculty team revived 
to beat the student team by a 
score of 295-245. 

The faculty team (the Red 
Devils) consisted of Joerg 
Mayer, chairman of the Depart- 
ment of Mathematical Sciences; 
Allan Wolfe, biology professor; 
Alice Strange, French professor; 
and Richard Joyce, professor of 
history. Deborah Dunn, a jun- 
iorpolitical science/English 
major; Michael Gross, a senior 
biology/accounting major; 
Roseann McGrath, a senior 
English/French major; and 
Leland Steinke, a freshman 
computer science major, re- 
presented the student team (the 
Bulldogs). Chaplain John 
Smith, a member of the Quiz 
Bowl committee, chose the 
participants on the basis of 
their talents and interests. 
Dean Richard Reed, vice- 
president and dean of LVC 
faculty, served as moderator. 

The competition featured 
questions developed by LVC 
faculty. The topics covered the 
social sciences, the humanities, 
sciences/mathematics, and 
current events/trivia. 

Reed opened the competition 
with the introduction of Dr. 
Robert Clay, chairman of the 
Quiz Bowl committee. Clay 
received applause for his tie 
and his doctorate, which he 
received this week. 

The first question, the 
profession of French physician 
Guillotine, was incorrectly 
answered by both the Bulldogs 
and the Red Devils. Steinke 
answered the next two 
answered the next two ques- 
tions correctly for the students. 
Joyce was the first of the Red 
Devils to answer correctly. 
Then the tension began to 
mount. 

11:35 -(120-185, Bulldogs' 
favor) Referring to the 
point spread, observer 
Lynn Cornelius said, 
"They're being trounced!" 
11:25 -(95-85, Red Devils 
leading) Mayer answered 
a bonus, visual-recognition 
question, which used the 
closed-circuit television. 



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11:40 - The Red Devils 
started to catch up by gar- 
nering bonus question 
points. 

11:45 - (185-185, first tie 
of the day) Steinke, in an- 
swering, accidently re- 
peated a previous answer. 
The question was turned 
over to the Red Devils. 
Joyce answered the toss- 
up and the bonus ques- 
tion correctly. 
11:47 - (215-185) Mayer 
increased the point spread 
when, on a math bonus 
question, he answered 
three out of four correctly, 
apparently guessing, "true, 
true, false, false." 
11:50 - Reed decided to 
extend the game by five 
minutes because "I botched 
one of the earlier ques- 
tions," which could have 
affected the outcome of 
the game. 

11:52 -(250-245) The Bull- 
dogs rallied to take the 
advantage by answering 
the toss-up and the bonus 
questions. 

11:55 - The Red Devils 
answered the final toss-up 
and bonus question, which 
was, "Name the authors 
of Brave New World, 
1984, and Farenheit 451. 
Commenting on the 
score, Reed said, "That 
avenges last year's rout!" 



Annville Artist 
Displays Work 



Paintings by Annville resi- 
dent Frank Rump are on dis- 
play in the College Center 
through March 27. The exhibit 
includes oils, watercolors, 
pencils, and pastels, all of 
which are for sale in the $100 
to $700 price range. 



WANTED 

The Easter Seal 
Society is in need of 
individuals to work 
with handicapped 
Men and Boys from 
June 15 to August 13 

*Salary *Room 
*Board 'Laundry 

For Further Details, 
Contact: 

Director of Recreation & Camping 
The Pennsylvania Faster Seal Society 
P.O. Box 497 
Middletown, PA 1 7057-O49 7 
Telephone: (7 1 7) 939 780 1 



1. 

3. 
4. 
6. 
7. 
8. 
9. 
11. 
13. 
15. 
16. 
17. 
18. 
20. 
21. 
23. 
25. 
26. 
34. 
35. 
36. 
37. 
38. 
39. 
40. 
44. 
45. 
46. 
47. 



ACROSS 

, Large, horned plant-eating mammal 
, The smallest hooved mammal 
, Unfriendly 
, Offer 
Exist 

Number of people present at a soliloquy 

Chemical symbol for the main element 

found in solar cells 

The bay state 

One nautical mile (abbrev) 

We 

Near 

Within (comb, form) 

The 13th letter of the greek alphabet 

Tellurium (chemical symbol) 

Tennis point won by a single stroke 

Modern art 

Measure of type 

A definite article 

Negative 

The 12th letter 

President of the United States during the 
California Gold Rush (2 words) 
Suffix for chemical alcohols 
Constricting snake 
Eleven is one (abbrev) 
Wonderment 
Baseball statistic 
Foot joint 

Knight's weapon against another knight 

DOWN 

Exclamation of greeting 
To glide on frozen water 
Largest city in the U.S. (abbrev) 
Chemical symbol for Ytterbium 
To anger 

In the year of our Lord (abbrev) 

Smoked pig thigh 

To restrain 

Belonging to him 

Pouched mammal 

In the work cited (abbrev) 

Chemical symbol for the 63rd element 

Cow restraining device 

Insect's organ of touch 

Shoulder blade 

A card game 

Consume 

Golf peg 

Sphere 

.The seventh letter of the greek alphabet 
An animal garden 
Bird of prey 

Female sheep (Homonym) 
Spun sheep fur 
Caviar 

Indefinite article 

Type of train 

Apiece (abbrev) 

Chemical symbol for actinium 



by Joe Bonacauisti 
IT 




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pg. 4 THE QUAD Friday, February 19, 1982 



One Act Plays Previewed 



by Roseann McGrath 

Alpha Psi Omega will pre- 
sent Three One- Act Plays on 
Saturday and Sunday of Par- 
ents' Weekend. Although each 
play is different in format and 
style from the others, each of 
the student-directed One- Acts 
makes an important statement 
about human relationships. 

Sharon Ford directs the first 
play, The Duelling Oakes, 
written by Bruce Kimes. This 
comedy centers around Bill 
and Sally Oakes, a newly-wed 
couple dealing with newly- 
wed-type problems. Portrayed 
by newcomers to the LVC 
stage, Tony Lamberto and Ruth 
Robinson, the young Oakes 
allow a little argument over 
sauerkraut to end up in an 
agreement to fight a duel — 
right in the living room of 
their new home. 

Friendly neighbors, played 
by Steve White and Margo 
Smith, try to help; but end up 
as seconds for the duel. As 
Aunt Elsie, Laurie McKan- 
nan, acts as a sort of unwanted 
third, getting in the way and 
adding more trouble than 
assistance. 

Sharon assures that the 
show will be amusing and de- 
lightful. "There are even 
special effects!" she says. 

The second play, Edna St. 
Vincent Millay's Aria Da 
Capo is much different than 
Kimes' comedy. Tom Myers 
directs this play-in-three-parts 
which is set up as a real aria da 
capo in opera would be. 

The show begins with a 
farce. Two Harlequin players, 
Pierrot and Columbine (Craig 
Cooper and Mary Secott) sit at 
a table and recite seemingly 
nonsensical things. This scene 
moves into a tragedy in which 
two shepherds, Cory don and 



Thyrsis (Jeff Conley and 
Vickie Ulmer), build a wall 
between each other as a game. 
However, the wall soon 
changes from a simple object 
in a game to a real block in the 
relationship between the 
friends. When this tragedy is 
resolved, the aria da capo 
moves back into a farce 
again. 

Tom Myers explains that 
Aria Da Capo is an important 
study on relations. "It brings 
its point across," winks Tom, 
"in an unusual manner of 
staging." All the actors in this 
one-act have performed in col- 
lege productions in the past 
and they feel ready and excited 
for opening day. 

The final play, directed by 
Tom Jameson, is an Anton 
Chekhov comedy entitled The 
Boor. This show is based on 
the old, melodramatic 
storyline of the mean creditor, 
played by Jeff Conley, who 
comes to collect money from 
the poor widow, Heidi Bass. 

The young widow in 
Chekhov's play lost her hus- 
band just seven months before 
the opening of the curtain. 
Her maid, played by Marilyn 
Alberian, is trying desperately 
to get the widow to socialize 
again. Although, as we soon 
learn, the husband was an un- 
faithful wretch, the widow 
wants to prove that she loves 
faithfully. 

When the creditor arrives to 
collect the money, he and the 
widow get into a verbal battle 
about who is more faithful in 
love — man or woman. 

Who is — man or woman? 
The answer will be given on 
January 20, beginning at 2:15 
p.m. and January 21, at 
8:00 p.m. 




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pg.5 THE QUAD 



Friday, February 19, 1982 



Bryden 's Diary Continues 



Trekking Throughout England, Belgium and France 



by Vicky Bryden 

Jan. 5 — Today I "escaped" 
the drudgeries of group 
touring and trained into Canter- 
bury. Canterbury is a medieval 
town about two hours south- 
west of London in the heart of 
Kent County. Again, the 
countryside was one great 
rolling green blocked off bv 
hedgerows. Here too I found 
lots of sheep! They have more 
sheep, as it seems than we have 
cattle. At Canterbury, I 
explored Canterbury 
Cathedral where King Henry 
IV is buried. When I came out 
of the Cathedral I was 
pleasantly greeted by blue sky 
and the not-very-often-seen 
sunshine. I walked through the 
narrow cobblestone streets of 
town to St. Augustine's 
Abbey. Then I walked back 
down through town and got 
some Chinese food. I arrived 
back in London in time to see 
"All My Sons" by Arthur 
Miller. The play was terrific! 
The acting was some of the 
finest I've ever seen! 
Throughout the trip, I saw a 
play, concert or opera every 
night. 

Jan. 9 — It had been snowing 
for two days straight. Most 
people stayed indoors so the 
theater district was half- 
deserted. I got a ticket for 
"Children of a Lesser God" 
which turned out to be the best 
play I saw on the trip. Before 
the show, I walked up to 
Covent Garden where there is 
a little mall with lots of fancy 
shops. Near the theater, I 
"discovered" a charming old 
wine pub. I got a huge chunk 
of fresh French bread, ripe 
Brie cheese, watercress salad 
and wine for under two 
pounds (four dollars)! It was a 
rustic place. A wine bottle 
with a candle lit each table and 
the place was not crowded at 
all. It was much cheaper to eat 
in the pubs. We frequented a 
pub near our hotel where we 
could get fish 'n' chips or 
other hot meals for under one 
pound (two dollars). 
Jan. 10— We went to the 
British Museum. I wandered 
mto the library of famous 
Publications and documents. 
The Magna Carta and the 



Rosetta Stone were in this 
museum. In the evening, Pat 
and I went to a Tchiakovsky 
Concert at Royal Albert Hall. 
They performed the Piano 
Concerto No. 1 and the concert 
ended with the 1812 Overture 
complete with an additional 
brass section and cannons 
going off. The British really 
know how to do it right! 
Jan. 12— Today I left London 
for Brussels, Belgium. I 
planned to meet a friend of 
mine from Germany. When 
the ferry left port at Dover I 
saw the magnificent white 
cliffs. They looked like white 
gold as the sun shone upon 
them. At the train station in 



London, I met a charming 
English woman and we 
became traveling companions. 
Jan. 14 — We had decided we'd 
seen enough of Brussels; all 
the lace shops, narrow cobble- 
stone streets and great night 
life. We bought train tickets to 
Tournai, a small medieval 
town about two and a half 
hours east of Brussels. The 
train took us through some 
lovely snow and ice-covered 
countryside. About three and 
a half hours down the tracks 
we decided to find out why we 
hadn't come to Tournai. 
Consulting a map in the back 
of our car, I found out that we 
had passed every little town, 




Fresh game at an English market 



not en route to Tournai, but to 
Paris! We couldn't have made 
a better mistake! We found a 
youth hostel near the Seine 
and Notre Dame Cathedral. 
On the way to the hostel, we 
passed several markets similar 
to the English markets. The 
most interesting were the meat 
and fish markets. Dead 
pheasants and rabbits hung 
from poles. There were also 
pigeons, octopus and exotic 
fish and roe. We also passed 
heavenly-smelling boulanger- 
ies (bakeries) and patisseries 
where you find the most intri- 
cate and delicious pastries in 
the world. We stopped at a 
few cafes and sat in the out- 
door area in one to watch the 
passersby. We walked down 
the Seine, passed Notre Dame 
in all its spendor, to Place de 
la Concorde where the famous 
Champs Elysees begins. Paris 
was all lit up and it snowed as 
we walked back towards the 
Latin Quarter where the stu- 
dents socialize. There, we 
stopped to eat a strawberry 
crepe and we stopped in a 
fancy cafe to make a toast to 
our one and only night in Paris! 

Jan. 15 — We made our way 
back to the Paris station and 
boarded a train to Brussels (we 
made sure it was going there!). 
In Brussels, we said, "Au 
revoir" and I got on a train to 
Oostende. At Oostende, I took 
the jetfoil across the channel 
to Dover. It was a ferry-like 
transporter that just glided 
across the top of the water on 
a big ski! 

Jan. 17 — Back in London. I 
decided to spend my last day 
in London just wandering 
around. I walked around 
Paddington area near our 



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hotel and I bought some of the 
best fish and chips wrapped up 
in white paper. I got on a 
double decker bus to Victoria 
Station and from there I 
walked to Westminster. I 
spent mOst of the day on 
Westminster Bridge and then I 
walked back to the hotel via 
the parks, including Hyde 
Park. It was sunset and the 
Serpentine lake was frozen, 
except in a few places where 
ducks and geese swam and 
were fed by people. It was 
really peaceful! That evening, 
Pat and I went to hear 
Handel's Messiah at the Royal 
Albert Hall. There were over 
400 voices in a combined 
choir. When they sang, it liter- 
ally sent chills up and down 
my spine. The sound was mag- 
nificent! It was an appropriate, 
or as the English say, "proper" 
way to end a wonderful trip! 



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pg. 6 THE QUAD Friday, February 19, 1982 




IN THE ACTION - Wrestling Coach Gerald Petrofes in 
his 25th year of coaching earned his 200th victory this season. 
Here he is seen directing traffic at a recent meet. 



Petrofes Earns 200th 



byJedDuryea 

Gerald Petrofes, in his 25th 
year as a wrestling coach, 
earned his 200th career victory 
against Western Maryland on 
February 6. 

Petrofes is currently in his 
19th year of coaching at 
Lebanon Valley College. He 
began his coaching career at a 
high school in Ohio, and in 
1962 he became assistant 
coach at Williams College in 
Massachusetts. 

In 1963 Petrofes took over 
the wrestling program at 
Lebanon Valley. Petrofes 
noted, "My first year we were 
4-0 by semester break, but due 
to the ineligibility of two 
wrestlers the rest of the season 
was a losing effort." 

By his 3rd and 4th seasons 
Petrofes had earned winning 
records of 6-5 and 9-3. Overall 
Petrofes has more winning 
seasons than losing ones. 



When asked about his 
strongest teams during his 
years at LVC, he said his team 
of 1974-75 whose record was 
16-3 and this year's team 
which finished 13-4 would be 
his two strongest. 

Also during his career at 
Lebanon Valley Petrofes saw 
two of his wrestlers, Steve 
Sanko and John Truscello, be- 
come All-Americans in the 
1901b. weight class. 

When asked how much he 
enjoyed coaching, Petrofes 
said, "Wrestling has always 
been an important part of my 
life and coaching is something 
I will always enjoy very 
much." 

This weekend Petrofes will 
get his team ready for the 
M.A.C. wrestling tournament 
at Lycoming College on Satur- 
day. 



Paul H. Kettering 

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Women Tough Against Eastern 



The LVC women's basket- 
ball team has been busy pre- 
paring for their 3-game week, 
which will culminate with a 
home game against Moravian 
on Saturday. 

The women's reaction to 
their past losses to Gettysburg 
and Eastern is favorable 
because they feel that they im- 
proved and played particularly 
well against Eastern. The team 
hoped to carry their improved 
play into their three games this 
week. 

Sophomore Faith Barnard 
says that her goal for this sea- 
son is "to improve individu- 



ally and to beat Wilson 
College." Kathryn Rolston, a 
junior transfer from Lesley 
College, feels that "a win in 
one of the remaining games 
would be a big boost for us." 

The women emphasize that 
they are playing teams which 
have established programs, 
and Amy Abbott points out, 
"we are inexperienced and 
face teams which recruit, and 
it shows." The women's bas- 
ketball team acknowledged 
they are in a building process. 
They feel that despite their 
winless record, the morale is 
great and the coach is very 



understanding and helpful. 

Kay Brown, a sophomore, 
noted, "we hope to constantly 
improve our program by 
developing our skills on the 
court. We are learning a lot 
and if the great attitude con- 
tinues I am hoping for a re- 
spectable showing in the next 
two years." 

Coach Smith's women will 
be looking for their first vic- 
tory of the season this week. 
The remaining teams on the 
schedule are tough, but the 
Valley dribblers are confident 
that the first victory will be 
this year. 



First Win OverE-Town in nine Years 

F&M Here for Saturday Finale 



The Valley basketball team 
began its drive for a .500 
season last Feb. 4 with an 82- 
66 win over Allentown 
College. Since then they have 
won three of five games to 
keep their hopes alive with a 
10-12 record. 

A win over Gettysburg 
Wednesday night will have set 
the stage for a Saturday night 
shootout with Franklin and 
Marshall in the final game of 
the season at Lynch Gym. 

The Dutchmen lost Feb. 6 to 
a strong and consistent Dick- 
inson team 86-74 but then re- 



bounded with wins over Eliza- 
bethtown 70-68 on Feb. 8 and 
Muhlenberg 74-63 Feb. 10. 
Albright downed Valley 79-70 
last Saturday, but the 
Dutchmen then crushed 
Alvernia 94-45 Monday night. 

The win over Elizabethtown 
was particularly satisfying 
since coach Fran Satalin had 
never beaten the Blue Jays. In 
fact, Elizabethtown had won 
all the previous games played 
during the last nine years. 

Satalin has been pleased 
with his team's performance 
during the last part of the 



season. Scott Mailen, Gary 
Freisinger and Bob Johnston 
have carried much of the 
attack; however, Satalin 
credits his bench with a large 
share of the team's success. 

Freshman Steve Weddle and 
senior Dave Light have made 
important contributions. It 
was Light in fact who helped 
seal the E-town win with a 
last-second steal. 

F&M, currently leading the 
MAC division, should win 
Saturday night, just as their 
football team should have won 
last fall. 



MAC Tournament This Weekend 



Wrestlers Finish Season at 13-4 



Last week the L.V.C. 
wrestling team decisively won 
two dual matches over 
Albright by the score of 38-6 
and Moravian 29-12. 

Both matches helped the 
Dutchmen get ready for 
Gettysburg College, one of 



their toughest opponents all 
year. The team had a dual 
meet record of 13-3 before 
going into the match. 

"We were confident that we 
could win," said coach Gerald 
Petrofes, but Gettysburg came 
away victorious by the score of 



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"Losses by some of our 
stronger wrestlers had an 
effect on the match, but the 
one that hurt us the most was 
the unfortunate injury to Jeff 
Carter which forced us to for- 
feit his match." 

The Dutchmen fought hard 
throughout the match which 
was their last dual meet of the 
season. The team finished its 
season with a record of 13-4. 

This weekend the team will 
participate in the M.A.C 
wrestling tournament at 
Lycoming College. 




MEMORABILIA! 

MOT 



THE 

QUAD 



Lebanon Valley College 



Self-Study Assesses Student Quality 

See p. 3 



March 5, 1982 
Volume 6, Number 10 
Annville, PA 17003 



ir 
n 
le 
is 
ff 
r- 

rd 
:h 
le 
its 

ill 

C 
at 



Goals Proposed for General Ed. 



The faculty subcommittee 
of the Curriculum Committee 
has come up with a proposed 
statement of philosophy and 
goals for general education at 
LVC. 

This is the first step in re- 
viewing and possibly 
revamping that part of the 
academic program common to 
all students. The current gen- 
eral education program is em- 
bodied in the college's seven 
distribution categories. 

According to Dr. Arthur 
Ford, chairman of the General 
Education Committee, once 

this first step is finished, the 
committee will then develop a 
program to implement the 



philosophy and goals. 
Following that, present 
courses will be adapted to the 
program if necessary and new 
courses could be developed. 

Ford said a new program 
could not possibly go into 
effect before September of 
1983. It could take longer than 
that. 

The ten goals have been 
divided into three 
components. The first 
component contains the 
"Fundamental Skills" needed 
by all students. The second 
component, "Connections," 
stresses the organization of 
knowledge around certain 
points of contact as listed in 



the goals. The third 
component, "Values," 
emphasizes the importance of 
values clarification for 
students. 

The components and goals 
are as follows: 

Component I — 
Fundamental Skills 

1. Composition 

2. Decision-making 

3. Mathematics (computers) 

4. Foreign Language 

Component II — 
Connections 

5. The past and the present 

6. The individual and social 
institutions 



7. Science and technology 

8. Our culture and other 
cultures 

8. The individual and the 
esthetic experience 

Component III — Values 

10. Investigation of value 
systems and their relation- 
ship to the individual 
Ford also said that his com- 
mittee has met with the faculty 
as a whole and has received 
suggestions from several 
individuals. It has been 
meeting twice a week and will 
have a revised philosophy and 
goals to submit to the faculty 
and students following Spring 
vacation. 



The revision will contain ra- 
tionales for the goals and 
guidelines for their implemen- 
tation. 

The committee will schedule 
open meetings with students so 
they will have an opportunity 
to express their views and re- 
actions. Students can also con- 
tact any committee member. 

Some student suggestions 
were incorporated into the 
current proposed goals as a 

result of meetings held with 
students last semester. 

Committee members are 

Ford, John Heffner, Allan 

Wolfe, Ralph Frey, Mike 

Grella, Robert Lau and 

Robert Clay. 



Clothes Charred 
In Vickroy Fires 



by Amy Hosteller 

A $150 dress and other 
clothes burned in fires in the 
two lavatories of first floor 
Vickroy last Saturday morning, 
at approximately 2:30 - 3 a.m. 

The clothes, belonging to 
Kari Littlewood and Alpha 
•Johnson, were hanging to dry 
from the shower rods. Accord- 
ing to the Dean of Women, 
Rosemary Yuhas, the burning 
cl °thes did not cause enough 
srn oke to trigger the fire alarms. 

At 4 a.m., Vickroy resident 
KlTn Long noticed the fires 
^ d notified resident assistant 
jj^chele Glascow. The head 

'A., Colleen Crammer, 
Recked the remains of the fire 
called Mr. Terry Gingrich 

LVC security. 



Dean of Students George 
Marquette and Yuhas are 
"working closely" with Gingrich 
and Mr. Walter Smith, director 
of the College Center, to inves- 
tigate the fires. According to 
Yuhas, "All the evidence is 
being collected," but, as 
Smith pointed, "There's just 
very little one can find out." 

It is known that the fire had 
been out for approximately 
one hour before Gingrich was 
called, according to Smith. 
However, he added, the inves- 
tigators have "no ideas at all" 
as to the identity of the arson- 
ist. It may have been a 
"townie," a resident student 
or a Vickroy resident. No one 
has questioned the residents of 
Vickroy for information con- 
see Fire, p. 2 



Cocktail Party for Seniors and Faculty 




Seniors chow down at party Tuesday. 



On Tuesday night, March 2, 
the LVC Senior Class and 
several faculty members 
attended a cocktail party cele- 
brating 82 days until gradua- 
tion. The party, held at St. 
Paul the Apostle Church, in 
Annville, "is hopefully the 
beginning of an LVC tradi- 
tion," according to Steve St. 
John, senior class treasurer. 

Other colleges have tradi- 
tionally held similar parties 
and St. John hopes that this 
event will build class unity 
among the seniors at LVC. 

When asked if this event 
was scheduled to take the 
place of the previously tradi- 
tional senior dinner with the 
president, St. John said that 
the cocktail party would have 
been held regardless of Presi- 
dent Sample's decision to 
abandon the usual senior 
dinner. 



pg-2 THE QUAD Friday, March 5, 1982 



THE QUAD 

Dawn Humphrey Managing Editor 

Michele DePrefontaine Copy Editor 

Mike Thomas News Editor 

Sharon Ford Features Editor 

Jed Duryea Sports Editor 

Jeff Conley Business Manager 

Rik Saltzer Advertising Manager 

Staff: Joe Bonaquisti, Vicky Bryden, Lynn 
Cornelius, David Frye, Amy Hostetler, Herb 
Hutchinson, Kay Koser, Tony Lamberto, Roseann 
McGrath, Mary McNamara, Darlene Olson, Ruth 
Robinson and Jud Stauffer. 

Arthur Ford Advisor 

THE QUAD is Lebanon Valley College's bi-weekly news- 
paper, providing the college community with up-to-date 
news, sports, and ideas concerning our campus. Any student 
or faculty member wishing to contribute to THE QUAD can 
contact any staff member. 



Editorial 



Aid Picture Darkening 



by Dawn Humphrey 

On April 1 , President Reagan wants to institute several cuts 
in the GSL loan program. Under the proposed cuts, the 
origination fee would be doubled to ten percent, all recipients 
would be subjected to a needs test regardless of income, and 
the nine percent interest rate would be increased to market 
rate two years after the student leaves school. 

But, even more distressing is the proposal that graduate 
students no longer be eligible for the GSL program at all. 
Instead, Reagan has proposed that graduate students borrow 
money at 14 percent, with no interest subsidy. 

Remember, these cuts are scheduled to go into effect in 
four weeks unless American college students can convince 
Congress of the potential consequences of this move. That's 
where you come in. Write to your congressman now! If you 
don't know who your congressman is, see Jeff Zellers, 
financial aid officer. He is compiling a list of congressmen 
who represent LVC students. He can also give you some 
advice in wording your letter if you are unsure of how to 
present your ideas. 

The important part is to write. Congressmen don't like to 
have unhappy constituents. Do something now, while you 
can. Don't wait until Congress cuts your financial aid by a half 
or two thirds. 

Even if you don't receive financial aid, you should be con- 
cerned about this proposal, because it will undoubtedly affect 
LVC. Over 75% of the students here receive some sort of 
financial assistance and the loss of such a substantial portion 
of it will mean a loss of students, and we certainly can't 
afford to lose any more than we already have. 

The government will keep cutting these programs as long as 
they think they can get away with it. And they will get away 
with it unless we start speaking up for ourselves. If these cuts 
are approved, the middle class is going to be knocked right 
out of colleges like this one. And, many of us will not be able 
to afford graduate school. You can't expect someone else to 
look out for your rights on this issue. Stopping the cuts is 
going to take the concentrated effort of all college students in 
the next few weeks. 

So, the bottom line is write -- right now! 

On the lighter side . . . 

Joe Wengyn and the rest of Student Council deserve to be 
congratulated on the Air Band Competition held in the Little 
Theater Saturday night. 

It was a well-run event, and a lot of fun for the participants 
and the audience. Wengyn and Company overcame the ever- 
present student apathy to put on a good show. We need more 
activities like this. Maybe people will start to loosen up a little 
about trying new things. 

Student Council could try sponsoring informal Talent Night 
programs in the Little Theater or East Dining Hall. Elizabeth- 
town College is starting a similar program this semester. They 



are having a special theme each Friday night, including Ori- 
ginal Songs Night, Music Major's Night, Variety Night, and 
Comedy Night. 

Events like this might foster a little more campus spirit and 
provide some good free entertainment. 

A social director isn't the magic answer to the serious social 
problems here that send people scurrying off campus when 
the weekend rolls around. The real answer is this kind of in- 
novation and flexibility on the part of Student Council and a 
receptive attitude on the part of the students. What we need is 
a greater variety of activities. Movies are nice, and important, 
but they shouldn't be the only form of entertainment offered 
on the weekend. Student Council has a lot of good ideas, but 
most of them depend on interest among the students. 

The next time there is an Air Band Competition or similar 
event, swallow your stage fright, shake off your apathy, and 
go a little crazy. We need a little more good-natured silliness 
around here. 




Dear Editor: 

What is Religious Emphasis Week anyway? My feelings 
about R.E. Week are that it should focus on religion. But I 
went to the first two programs and the emphasis was not on 
religion. 

Monday night's program went over everyone's head. It was 
boring and a flop. Tuesday's program was not much better. 
Even professors are more interesting than that. 

Even though the programs were boring, I felt embarrassed 
due to the lack of participation of the student body. 

There were only ten students at the program Monday night 
and that includes the organist, the technician and the two 
students involved in the program. 

Same goes for chapel. No one cares about the impression 
they are giving to outsiders about the school and themselves. 
If they don't care about the school, then why are they here? 

A student upset at the 
school and the students 



Dear Editor: 

I am furious and appalled at the seeming lack of concern 
demonstrated by the college administration about the fires in 
Vickroy last Saturday and last semester. 

So far, no one has questioned the residents of 1st floor 
Vickroy. Why not? Maybe they could tell Gingrich and Smith 
what's going on, as they don't seem to know. 

From talking with other students, I have learned of the 
inefficiency of LVC's fire alarm systems. What good is a fire 
alarm if you can place burning matches underneath it without 
the alarm going off, as in Funkhouser West? 

I think that the fire alarms and security systems in our 
dorms should be re-evaluated. Obviously the safety of the 
students is at stake. 



A frightened 1st floor 
Vickroy resident 



Stafford Presents Recital 



David Stafford, a member 
of the Lebanon Valley College 
music faculty, will play the 
guitar in a recital, Thursday, 
March 4, at 8:30 p.m. in the 
college's Blair Music Center. 

Stafford will open his 
program with the Crusaders 
Hymn, Fairest Lord Jesus, 
followed by a traditional 
Gaelic melody, Morning Has 
Broken. 



An Oklahoma native, Staf- 
ford has lived in Camp Hill 
since 1955. He attended Camp 
Hill High School and gradu- 
ated from Valley Forge Military 
Academy. At the age of 24, he 
began studying classical guitar 
at Philadelphia's Combs 
College of Music. 

Stafford serves as adjunct 
instructor of guitar at LVC. 



2nd Q-Bowl 
Features 46 
High Schools 

Students representing 46 high 
schools from eight counties in 
Pennsylvania will compete in 
the Second Annual Lebanon 
Valley College Quiz Bowl on 
Saturday, March 20. The day- 
long event, involving rounds 
of fast-paced contests of 
general and academic know- 
ledge between teams, will take 
place from 9:30 a.m. to 4:30 
p.m., concluding with trophy 
presentations to the top four 
teams. The campus community 
is invited to attend the event at 
no charge. Anyone interested 
in working at the Quiz Bowl 
should contact Mary Jean 
Bishop or Deb Detwiler, 

Playoff rounds featuring 
the top 16 teams from the 
morning competitions will be- 
gin at 1:30 p.m. in the music 
center and chapel. Semi-finals 
are scheduled to take place 
from 2:50 p.m. to 3:45 p.m. in 
Lutz Hall of the Blair Music 
Center with the final competi- 
tion immediately following at 
4 p.m. Dr. Frederick P. Sample, 
president of the college, will 
present trophies to the top 
four teams upon completion 
of the Quiz Bowl. 

From 9:30 a.m. to 12 p.m. 
six rounds of competition will 
be held in various locations in 
the Blair Music Center and the 
Miller Chapel. Although eight 
students have been selected by 
each high school to participate 
in the event, only four- 
member teams will compete 
in the rounds. Electronic 
boards, specially designed for 
the LVC Quiz Bowl will 
indicate the contestant who 
signals first to answer ques- 
tions ranging in category from 
social science to humanities to 
science and mathematics. 
Other questions pertaining to 
topics such as movies, sports, 
popular culture, and television 
will also be included in the 
competition. 

Fire - cont. from p. 1 

cerning the fire. 

Smith tried to contact 
Crammer for information in 
addition to the report filed by 
Gingrich over the weekend but 
was unable to reach the head 
R.A. 

Although this is the second 
fire in the lavatories of first 
floor Vickroy this year, Smith 
said that he did not know of 
any plans to increase security. 

Crammer informed Little- 
wood and Johnson about the 
fire and the property damag e 
but did not tell them to file fire- 
damage reports. 



pg. 3 THE QUAD Friday, March 5, 1982 



Self-Study Offers Straight Talk on Student Quality 



by David Frye 

"An increasingly competitive 
market and declining numbers 
of potential students will make 
it difficult for Lebanon Valley 
College to maintain the size 
and quality of its student 
body," states the Report of 
the SELF-STUDY of 
LEBANON VALLEY 
COLLEGE. 

The Student Recruitment 
and Retention Committee 
based this observation, in 
part, upon changes in mean 
SAT verbal and mathematics 
scores of freshmen entering 

LVC from 1979-1980. 

An additional fact from a 
September 1, 1981 report from 
the Office of Admissions 
points to the same conclusion. 
The mean verbal SAT scores 
for the freshmen class entering 
this past fall fell by 17 points, 
while the mean math SAT 
scores dropped by 10 points. 
This comparison is with the 
entering class of 1980. 



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In the SELF-STUDY, the 
most recent figures are from 
1979 and 1980 and compare 
mean SAT scores for various 
academic areas. Physical 
Sciences, which includes 
physics and chemistry, 
displayed the largest increase 
in mean SAT verbal scores, a 
70-point jump. Music 
experienced a 49-point 
increase, Engineering, a 31- 
point increase, English, 22 
points, Biological Sciences, 15 
points, and Social Services, 5 
points. Social Sciences include 
political science, pre-law, 
social work, and sociology, 
but not psychology or history. 



ANALYSIS 



Some areas showed 
declining mean verbal scores. 
Business and Commerce and 
Mathematics experienced 5- 
point declines, Education, a 
37-point drop, and Health and 
Medical, a 41 -point decline. 

In the figures for mean SAT 
mathematics scores, Physical 
Sciences again showed the 
largest increase, 72 points. 
Biological Sciences registered 
a 54-point gain, Engineering, 
38 points, Music, 32 points, 
Mathematics, 14 points, and 
Business and Commerce, 9 
points. 

Education and Social 
Services experienced 4- and 11- 
point declines respectively, 



while Health and Medical 
dropped by 32 points. English 
fell 72 points. 

As a partial explanation of 
these figures, the SELF- 
STUDY states, ''Student 
quality and program quality 
seem to be closely related: 
strong programs attract good 
students who, in turn, make 
strong programs successful." 

The SELF-STUDY goes on 
to cite the development of the 
Department of Business 
Administration and the new 
Honors Program as an 
example of the College's 
continuing emphasis upon 
quality in eduation. 

In addition, the SELF- 
STUDY states, "Historically, 
the College has been successful 
in recruiting moderate 
numbers of highly-qualified 
students." Enrolled freshmen 
at LVC tend to have better 
class rank in high school, more 
desire for a rigorous 
curriculum, and more 
advanced schooling in mind 
than other freshmen at other 
small colleges. 

Jeff Conley, a junior 
accounting major, a student 
worker in the Office of 
Admissions, and a member of 
the Student Recruitment and 
Retention Committee, 
commented on the problem 
of possible declining student 
quality facing the College. 
"Because the enrollment was 
lower this year, it hurt the 
College financially. Therefore, 
I am sure the Office of 
Admissions is trying to 
increase the quantity of 



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students for this coming year, 
and in doing so, they may 
accept some students they 
ordinarily would not accept. 
Since tuition will be the same, 
they'll need more students to 
make up the increase in 
costs." 

Conley added though, that 



"through four Open Houses, 
two Presidential Scholarship 
Days, and the Quiz Bowl 
Competition, along with the 
regular Admissions program, 
they hope to have more 
higher-qualified students 
become aware of LVC." 



Yearbook in Danger 



by Darlene Olson 

Rebecca Enslin, editor of 
the Quitte, is a senior this year 
and is worried about the 
future of the yearbook after 
she graduates. 

According to Enslin and 
Harold Ulmer, Public 
Relations Director, and 
advisor to the yearbook, the 
major problem is the lack of 
help on the staff. Enslin said 
that students just are not 
getting involved and "to 
saddle it all on one person is 
unfair." 

At this point Enslin has no 
one to take over after she 
leaves and she wonders what 
will happen to the yearbook. 



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Friday 8:30 a.m. - 4:00 p.m. 



She feels that if more people 
would join the staff and 
"everyone would do his or her 
part" the yearbook could be 
better that it is now. 

Ulmer also says that if the 
help does not improve, then 
the yearbook will probably 
have to change drastically. It 
would probably be just a small 
thin book with only "head 
shots" of everyone and 
possibly no organizational 
pictures. 

Both Enslin and Ulmer feel 
that the yearbook is a major 
part of college life. "It is 
something that students can 
have and look at and see their 
life on campus," according to 
Enslin. 

Ulmer asked, "How im- 
portant is the yearbook as it is 
now? How important are 
color photos and the size or 
the hardback cover?" 

Some students feel that the 
price is too high for a 
yearbook. Enslin said, "In 
comparison to other schools, 
ours is the price of high 
schools' nowadays." If more 
people helped though, this 
might improve. As it is, Ulmer 
said that next year, money will 
have to be spent on freelance 
photographers if students are 
not going to volunteer. 

Another thing that bothered 
Enslin was the difficulties she 
had getting organizations and 
photographers together. She 
feels that if someone could 
organize the scheduling and if 
organizations cooperated, it 
would go a lot more smoothly. 



CITY 

LIMITS | 

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Annville 

Good Food, Cold Beer 

867-9971 



4 1 Hr, IJV AD rriday, Marcn 5, 

Heisey: Recovered "Pac-Maniac" 



by Sharon Ford 

Are you looking for some- 
thing to do on Fridays after 
classes that costs only a quar- 
ter and can last up to six 
hours? If you are, talk to Jon 
Heisey who spent six hours 
last Friday, February 19, 
playing Pac Man; Jon finished 
only one quarter poorer with a 
total score of over three 
million. 

After a year of playing Pac 
Man, Jon understands the 
game quite well. By 
discovering certain repeating 
patterns and "safe spots" on 
the machine, he has become 
an accomplished player. Jon 
explains that he has found a 
certain corner on the machine 
that "throws the computer 
off" and keeps the enemy 
from coming down to "get 
you." When his "guy" is 
positioned in this corner, Jon 
takes a break. 

He claims, "I can get up, go 
to the bathroom, get 
something to eat, yawn, sit 
down, and my guy will still be 
there." 

Last year, Jon, a sopho- 
more Music Education major 
who commutes from Lebanon, 
considered himself a "Pac- 
Maniac." He would spend up 
to three hours, and five 



dollars, daily playing Pac Man. 
Something unique about this 
computer game, made by the 
Midway company, attracted 
Jon, even before the game 
became popular. He studied 
for finals in the gameroom, 
observing other people and 
figuring out different patterns. 
Jon and his friends, Dale 
Groome and Dave Blauch, 
challenged each other's scores. 
However, Jon adds, "There 
was no rivalry or competi- 
tion;" they simply motivated 
each other. 

Now, Jon boasts, "The 
days I'd plug five dollars a day 
into the machine are long 
gone!" Spending an average 
of five cents an hour, he 
plays only once a week. 
"People would start rooting 
against me," he laughs, "They 
kept wondering when I was 
going to stop!" 

But on the day of his three 
million victory, Jon had many 
cheerleaders. While he was 
there, between 2:30 and 9:30, 
his friends constantly stopped 
in to check on his score. 

How could he sit there for 
six hours without going crazy? 
Jon must have suspected that 
day was going to be special for 
him. He admitted that the 



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noises of the machine were 
getting to be monotonous, but 
after a while he blocked them 
out and listened to the music 
on the TV. Jon would have 
been able to continue playing, 
but once he scored 3,281,081, 
the computer went "bizarre." 
Half of the maze disappeared, 
and he could not see anything; 
but "graphics" on one side of 
the board. 

Jon has no advice to 
beginners except "practice." 
He does not believe that the 
books explaining how to "beat 
the machine" really work. 
Since the machines are 
constantly re-programmed, 
Jon predicts that people are 
going to be discouraged from 
playing the game. But he adds 
with a smile that the machine 
in the snack shop has become 
easier since it was re- 
programmed. 

Jon, unfortunately, did not 
set any records; according to 
the Associated Press, people 
have played on one quarter for 
over 50 hours. However, 
scoring three million in six 
hours is nothing to laugh 
about; try it and see. 




MUSIC'S 
ARCO 

Main & White Oak, 

Annville 
867-1161 838-4663 

AAA Service 
State Inspection 
Mon. thru Fri. 8-5; 
Sat. 8-12 



Jon Heisey 



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But if you ARE, Stop by 

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BEVERAGE 838-2462 



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OPEN 

Monday Thru Saturday 
9 AM- 9PM 




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corner Rt. 934 & Rt. 22 

Fine Dining 

Hours — 5:00- 10:00 p.m. 

Bar — 5:00 - 12:00 midnight 
Reservations Call 

865-9357 

after 3:30 p.m. ask for Elaine 

Banquet Facilties Available 
Closed Sunday and Monday 



EARN at least $80.00 
per month. Donate 
plasma at Sera-Tec 
Biologicals. Open 
Monday thru Thurs- 
day from 8:30 a.m. 
to 7:00 p.m. and Fri- 
days from 8:30 a.m. 
to 4:00 p.m. Stop in 
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call for information 
at 232-1901. 




Services tor the 

entire family 
109 W. Main St. 
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Jean C. Bomgardner 
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u 



pg. 5 THE QUAD Friday, March 5, 1982 



Crossword Puzzle 



by Joe Bonacquisti 

ACROSS 



n 



1. The decaying organic matter found on a 

forest floor 
4. Aide- de-camp (abbrev.) 
7. The small metal hoop that supports a 
lampshade 
Him 

13. To exclaim in amazement 
15. Chemical symbol for selenium 
17. In case that 
19. The flow of tide water 
21. Attempts 

23. Earth, ground (comb, form) 

24. Furry feline 

26. Suffix forming the comparative degree 

27. Greene's dog food 

28. Prefix meaning not 

30. Pipe metal (chemical symbol) 

31. The Tarheel state 

35. Tantalum (chemical symbol) 

36. Ocean 

37. Guided missile (abbrev.) 

39. Near 

40. Type of 37 across 

41. A festive celebration 

42. The 13th letter of the Greek alphabet 

43. Scottish variation of self 

44. Past participle of be 

45. Country containing Athens (abrev.) 

46. lam 

48. Prosecuting officer of a judicial district 

49. Towards 

50. Things that ensnare 

56. That is 

57. Upon 

59. Part of a play 




61. Greeting from a red suited reindeer owner, 
61 across, 61 down 

62. A hinged fastening for a door 
65. South Asian peoples 

67. Prefix meaning again 

68. The Roman sun god 



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Director of Recreation & Camping 
The Pennsylvania Faster Seal Society 
P.O. Box 497 
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Telephone. I'I7) 93^7801 



The sisters of Kappa 
Lambda Nu are 
proud to welcome 
our new sisters: 



Kristi Barbatschi 
Amy Barefoot 
Sherri Becker 
Sue Brewer 
Ann Buchman 
Veronica Devitz 
Leslie Engesser 
Michele Gawel 
Betsy Gross 
Virginia Lotz 
Sue Newman 
Jeanne Page 
Becky Powell 
Karen Tulaney 
Heather Walter 



69. Prayer endings 

71. Intercontinental conflicts (abbrev.) 

72. Myself. 

73. Type of radio 

75. Hooved, antlered, ruminant 

76. Creator of man and the universe 

77. 12 point type 



DOWN 

2. Interjection indicating hesitation 

3. Charge for services 

5. Information used for reasoning 

6. Actor Reiner 

8. Donkey 

9. Second tone of the diatonic scale 

10. A burst of speed in racing 

12. The great emancipator (2 words) 

14. These creatures are the second largest land 

animals; they spend most of their day in 

the water 
16. Interpretation of the Avesta 
18. The fourth tone of the diatonic scale 
20. Prefix meaning around 

22. Earliest, oldest (comb, form) 

23. To continue onward 
25. Deuce 

28. Female equivalent of a monk 

29. The lighter or shorter part of a poetic foot 

30. Unit of radioactivity 

31. "Mother" of the forest 

32. The fourth month of the civil year in the 
Jewish calendar (_ t) 

33. Parched 

34. Coverings on the end of shoelaces 

35. The projected prong on a tool or 
instrument 

38. A stone used for grinding food 

41. The code name for the chemical warfare 

agent Sarin, which is a powerful cholines- 

terase inhibitor 

47. Silver-white metallic element used in 
photography (chemical symbol) 

48. Prefix meaning the reverse of 

51. Louse egg 

52. Semi-metallic element with 52 electrons 
(chemical symbol) 

53. Definitely not 

54. Explosive 

55. Poet 



58. Flightless New Zealand bird 

60. The most abundant metallic element of the 
rare-earth group (chemical symbol) 

61. Greeting from a red suited reindeer owner; 
61 across, 61 down 

62. Interjection used to express surprise 

63. State of being 

64. Promissory note (abbrev.) 

66. Interjection used to express mild sympathy 
68. Observe 

70. Relating to science fiction; -fi 

72. I 

74. Before Christ 

Urban Semester 
Representative 
AtLVC Thurs. 

Jan Filing, a representative 
from the Metropolitan 
Semester in Germantown, will 
be on campus Thursday, 
March 18 from 10:00 a.m. to 
3:30 p.m. in the College 
Center. Students interested in 
obtaining information about 
an urban semester in 
Germantown are invited to 
talk with Jan. Students can 
also contact student liaison 
persons, Sandy Hetrick and 
Barbara Strock, and the 
faculty liaison, Carolyn 
Hanes. 



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pg.6 THE QUAD Friday, March 5, 1982 



RESSOR NAMED 
ALL-AMERICAN 



Freshman Gary Ressor 
became a wrestling Ail-Ameri- 
can by placing 6th in the Divi- 
sion III National Tournament. 
Mike LaPorta, who placed 
2nd in the MAC tournament, 
also qualified for Nationals. 



4 








BBS! 





Gary Ressor 

Ressor finished the season 
with an overall record of 28-5. 
In the MAC tournament, 
Ressor placed 2nd which 



qualified him for the National 
Tournament where he finished 
with a record of 4-3. Ressor 
had victories over wrestlers 
from Montclair State, Brock- 
port State, Washington Uni- 
versity in Missouri and Albany 
State. 

Mike LaPorta, who had a 
record of 3-1 in the MAC 
tournament, lost his first 
match in the Nationals to a 
wrestler from Worcester Insti- 
tute by a score of 4-1. LaPorta 
finished the season with an 
overall record of 18-8. 

Coach Gerald Petrofes said 
that both wrestlers worked ex 
tremely hard in the 
tournaments and during the 
regular season, and that they 
are to be commended for their 
effort. 



Basketball Teams 
Wrap Up Seasons 



Men's Basketball 

The Dutchmen basketball 
team finished their season with 
a record of 11-13. While not 
on the surface particularly im- 
ressive, it was the best record 
in four years. 

Adding to coach Fran 
Satalin's optimism is the fact 
that the Valley compiled the 
highest shooting percentage in 
the country in Division III 
play. 

Satalin commented on this 
distinction: "It is a good sign. 
It's a good feeling when you 
know you are getting better. 
We could easily have won the 
last three games." 

Satalin also discussed the 
loss of his three seniors and 
the effect of that loss on next 
year's team. Scott Mailen, 
team captain, was the fourth 
leading scorer in the school's 
history, scoring over 1450 
points and averaging eight re- 
bounds a game during his four 
year career. 

Satalin said, "Not having 
Scott will be a definite loss. 
We'll miss his rebounding, his 
ability to get a basket, his 
leadership, but mostly we'll 
miss him as a person." 

The team will also lose Dave 
Light to graduation. Satalin 
said of Light: "Dave had an 
outstanding year. When he got 
hurt during the F&M game, it 
really hurt the team. If he 
hadn't gotten hurt, I honestly 
feel we could've won the 
game." 

This was also Ken Hender- 
shot's last year. Satalin said of 
him: "Kenny had his best 
year — certain games he really 
helped us win. He was very 
valuable as first man off the 



bench. We'll have a tough 
time replacing him; he played 
tough all the time." 

Even though the season has 
just ended, Satalin is already 
looking forward to next year. 
One reason for the Valley's 
outstanding shooting percen- 
tage was Gary Frysinger, and 
he is just a junior. In the last 
nine games he shot 60 percent 
from the field. 

Satalin added, "Our recruit- 
ing outlook is good. However, 
next year we'll have a 
completely different type of 
team. We'll be quicker, we'll 
pass more; we'll finally have 
the players to do it." 

Women's Basketball 

The women's basketball 
team ended the season on a 
winning note with a 51-42 
victory over Wilson College. 
The squad finished the season 
with an overall record of one 
win against seven losses. 

This is the one win that the 
women were anticipating 
throughout the season, and 
they were elated by the 
victory. After experiencing 
their first win, the team 
anticipates more of the same 
for next year. 

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LVC Spring Sports Previewed 

Baseball, lacrosse featured 



Baseball 

According to Coach Ned 
Smith, before the Valley base- 
ball team opens against 
Moravian College at home 
March 24, they will have to fill 
a few key positions. 

The most important 
positions still up for grabs are 
catcher and second baseman. 
Brian Cain and Talbot Barrow 
are battling for the catcher's 
spot, while John Taormino 
and Vaughn Robbins will vie 
for second base. 

Smith hopes the team 
batting will improve on its 
.208 average last year. The 
pitching staff is expected to be 
the team's strong suit. 

Returning pitchers include 
Frank Rhoades, Ed Donnelly, 
Talbot Barrow, Bob 
Johnston, Herb Hutchinson 
and Tony Gasperini. 
Newcomers to the staff are Jay 
Haggerty, Mark Smith and 
Bob Muir. 

Other than second base, the 
infield will consist of Steve 
Nelson at first, Ron Robb at 
shortstop and John Parsons at 
third. 



The outfield will see speed- 
sters John Vaccaro, Mike 
Groody and John Fiester. 

Smith summed up his opti- 
mistic outlook on the season: 
"It looks like a very promising 
year. If we get some breaks, 
we'll be all right." 

Men's Lacrosse 

The men's lacrosse team has 
begun practicing for its spring 
season, and according to head 
coach Bruce Correll it's going 
to be a very tough year. 

Four teams that the Dutch- 
men will face this season are 
ranked in the top 20 in 
Division 3 Lacrosse. "We play 
teams such as Fairleigh Dick- 
inson, F&M, Lafayette and 
Swarthmore. There is no 
doubt we will have our work 
cut out for us." says Correll. 

Thirteen lettermen return 
this season, including Co- 
Captain and All-Conference 
select, Tom McArdle, and Co- 
Captain, Joel Ronco, who for 
the past three years has been 
ranked among the top 15 
goalies in Division 3. Correll 
stated that the team's strength 
is in its defense where there is 
good talent and depth. "How 



well we play this season 
depends on how well our 
offensive attack plays," said 
Correll. Jack Raymond 
returns at one attack position 
but the other two spots remain 
open. 

The team opens its season 
against defending conference 
champions F&M at home on 
March 27. 

Women's Lacrosse 

Head coach Janet Harriger 
"anticipates a very tough 
season " for the LVC 
women's lacrosse team. This 
year's squad has 13 members 
with only three returning 
letterwomen. 

Providing the leadership for 
the young team will be head 
coach Harriger, assistant 
Rosemary Yuhas, and co- 
captains Sue Newman and 
Sheila McElwee. 

"We lost quite a few players 
through graduation and many 
other ways," Harriger said. 
But she was quick to point out 
that the women will be ready 
for a predictably difficult 
opener against Millersville on 
March 27. 




Captain Joel Ronco leads Lacrosse squad in workout. 



Paul H. Kettering 

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THE 

QUAD 



Lebanon Valley College 



Quad Expands 



See Pages 7,8 



March 26, 1982 
Volume 6, Number 11 
Annville, PA 17003 



Newsletter Causes Stir 



by David Frye 

Early last week, Dr. Ralph 
W. Frey, Chairman of the De- 
partment of Business Admin- 
istration, mailed a newsletter 
to prospective students and 
alumni of his department, in- 
forming them of his intent to 
resign. 

The content of the 
newsletter, received by 193 
prospective students and 800 
alumni, aroused considerable 
concern among administrators 
and faculty when they learned 
of several statements Frey 
made. 

He began the newsletter by 
saying: "In the first News- 
letter, I took the opportunity 
to introduce myself to all of 
you. With this newsletter, I 
deeply regret I must inform 
you that I am resigning from 
Lebanon Valley College. 
When I was hired last year, the 
Administration made a 
number of commitments con- 
cerning the growth and 
strengthening of this 
Department. The College is 
not honoring these commit- 
ments, therefore, if I am to be 
honest to myself and the stu- 
dents to whom I have made 
Promises (that I now cannot 
J^ ee P), I have no alternative 
out to leave Lebanon Valley 
College. This means that in the 
fell, the Department will not 
have anyone on the staff with 
doctorates in the area of ac- 
counting, management or 
marketing." 

The main body of the news- 
ier highlighted recent 
nirin gs, achievements, and de- 
partmental activities. 

1° the concluding para- 
|j ra Ph, he stated: "We 
.^empted to institute a major 
Computer Management 



within the Department. With 
the increasingly vital role that 
computers play in all of our 
lives, I personally believe a 
computer major within the 
Department is critical for both 
the students and the long term 
viability of the Department. 
But at the present time this 
request was turned down by 
the President." 

Frey plans to submit his res- 
ignation soon. He observed, 
"The Policy Manual says you 
can resign from a contract 
with four months' notice." 

Dr. Richard Reed, Dean of 
the Faculty, confirmed that 
last week Frey gave President 
Frederick P. Sample a signed 
letter of appointment for the 
1982-83 academic year. 

When asked why he would 
publicly announce his intent to 
resign and privately sign a 
letter of appointment, Frey 
responded, "No comment." 

Explaining the nature of the 
commitments mentioned in 
the opening paragraph, Frey 
said, "My largest concern is 
the lack of additional resour- 
ces for full-time faculty. The 
second one is the inability (of 
the College) to establish a 
Computer Applications major 
in the Business Department." 

He added, "These are the 
two major commitments I per- 
ceive to have been made when 
I came here." If it were not for 
these commitments, he 
"wouldn't have come here." 

Reed explained that "the 
commitment was for seven 
people for this year, and eight 
for next year. In fact, we 
jumped the gun and provded 
eight for this year." 

Frey stated, "My under- 
standing is that they would 
continue to add one or two 
new faculty members each 



year for three or four years, to 
get the faculty in the range of 
twelve to fourteen full-time." 

"The commitment this year 
was two new faculty, for a 
total of eight," he continued. 
Frey expected one or two 
additional faculty members 
for next year. 

Frey said the major in Com- 
puter Management "was 
developed by the faculty of the 
department. Dean Reed was 
one of the major forces in this, 
pushing to get something 
done." 

Reed said, "I designed it, 
and Dr. Frey and Dr. Mayer 
were behind me." 

Dr. Joerg W.P. Mayer, 
Chairman of the Department 
of Mathematical Sciences, 
stated he and Frey "designed 
one together. We didn't know 
whether it would be housed in 
business or mathematics. 
After I had signed the 
proposal, it came to my 
knowledge that Dr. Frey was 
going to support the proposal 
only if another person came 
into his department." 

On March 1, Sample sent a 
memo to the Faculty 
informing them all proposals 
concerning expanding 
computer use would be 
gathered and considered as a 
unified program. This, in 
Reed's estimate, would allow 
the College to enact new pro- 
see Frey, p. 4 




Marquette Announces 
LVC Activities Director 



by Sharon Ford 

Tuesday, March 23, Dean 
of Students George Marquette 
publicly announced that Ms. 
Cheryl Lynn Reihl will be ser- 
ving as LVC's Director of Stu- 
dent Activities, as of July 1, 
1982. Upon advertising in the 
Chronicle of Higher Educa- 
tion, Marquette received 
applications from 21 
interested individuals; and the 
elimination process began. 

Although the interviews and 
final selection processes were 
Marquette's responsibilities, 
random students were 
questioned about their 
preferences and expectations. 
Marquette concluded that 
most students prefered a 



Anyone wishing to meet with 
Middle States Evaluators April 4-7 
should contact Dean Reed's 
secretary in the Administration 
Building to schedule an appoint- 
ment. See article on page 7. 



younger individual who had 
no former association with the 
college. 

Out of the 21 applicants, 8 
were selected on the basis of 
education and experience. 
After holding interviews with 
these eight people, Marquette 
selected the four who would 
best meet the students' needs. 
Marquette admitted that 
although all four had equal 
qualifications, Ms. Reihl was 
outstandingly more suited for 
the position; he felt she has the 
necessary personality and en- 
thusiasm for the job. 

In 1977 Reihl received her 
undergraduate degree in 
Home Economics/Interior 
Design from the University of 
North Carolina-Greensboro. 
She then served as a Field 
Director and Outdoor Pro- 
gram Director for the Girl 
Scouts of Delaware County. 
In 1979 she pursued a master's 
degree in Higher Education 
Administration: Student 
Affairs at the University of 
Connecticut. 

After serving two intern- 
see Director, p. 2 



A Farewell to Frey 



pg. 2 THE QUAD Friday, March 26, 1982 



THE QUAD 

Dawn Humphrey Managing Editor 

Michele DePrefontaine Copy Editor 

Mike Thomas News Editor 

Sharon Ford Features Editor 

Jed Duryea Sports Editor 

Jef f Conley Business Manager 

Rik Saltzer Advertising Manager 

Staff: Joe Bonaquisti, Vicky Bryden, Lynn 
Cornelius, David Frye, Amy Hostetler, Herb 
Hutchinson, Kay Koser, Tony Lamberto, Roseann 
McGrath, Mary McNamara, Darlene Olson, Ruth 
Robinson and Jud Stauffer. 

Arthur Ford Advisor 

THE QUAD is Lebanon Valley College's bi-weekly news- 
paper, providing the college community with up-to-date 
news, sports, and ideas concerning our campus, Any student 
or faculty member wishing to contribute to THE QUAD can 
contact any staff member. 



Editorial 



Newsletter: Vindictive Stunt 



by Dawn Humphrey 

Last week, Dr. Ralph Frey, chairman of the Business Ad- 
ministration department released a newsletter which was, for 
the most part technically correct, but which left a horrible 
taste in a lot of mouths. 

In a shrewdly calculated move, he apparently sought to 
hurt not only President Sample, with whom he has had a per- 
sonal disagreement, but also everyone else connected with the 
college. 

The newsletter is only one example of Frey's recent unpro- 
fessionalism. He has been talking out of both sides of his 
mouth, telling Sample and Dean of the Faculty Richard Reed 
that he was satisfied, and even turning in a signed contract for 
next year, while at the same time telling his colleagues and his 
students that he was resigning. 

The issue here is not whether or not Frey's complaints are 
valid. Many, if not most people at this school have valid criti- 
cisms of Sample and the Administration in general, but no 
one else has resorted to petty, vindictive stunts like Frey has. 
Luckily, most members of the campus community have the 
maturity to see their department or special interest within the 
context of the school as a whole. 

Frey has said that his main concern is for the students. That 
is hard to believe, because in questioning the credibility of the 
Business Department curriculum, he is jeopardizing students' 
chances for getting jobs when they graduate. Also, Frey 
knows as well as anyone else the tremendous strides the de- 
partment has made in the last year and a half. Yet, by his 
comments, he tried to imply that the program is in trouble. 

Reactions to what Frey did have ranged from anger to dis- 
appointment to chagrin, but in talking to faculty, students and 
administrators, I have found the predominant feeling to be 
one of betrayal. Frey wined and dined his students, attended 
groves and generally gave students the impression he would 
fight the Administration on their behalf. He also established 
personal friendships with some administrators and faculty 
members. Then he turned around and stabbed all of those 
people in the back. 

As an accountant, Frey must have known the economic 
impact his newsletter would have. He targeted his attack 
directly at two of the college's most important sources of 
revenue — alumni and prospective students. If his intention 
was to hurt Sample alone, he certainly could have found a 
more direct route but if his intention was to harm the institu- 
tion as a whole he couldn't have found a better way. 

Frey has gotten his dig in, and now he'll skip off to another 
job, because he has the luxury of possessing a highly-deman- 
ded degree and a highly under-developed conscience. Mean- 
while, the rest of us who have some sense of loyalty to the 
school and some concern for other human beings will be left 
to sweep up. 



Dear Editor, 

This poem's inspiration lives in a departing department 
chairman. Although written last March, the poem captures 
the spirit of the present. Please share it with the College 
community. 

DACHSHUNDS 

He stands in the cold bright sunshine 
dark green overcoated back resolute 
against the chilling wind 
tugging at the plaid Dickens scarf 
encircling his bearded and 
curly black-haired head. 

At his feet, three dachshunds 
— the smallest the liveliest — 
tug at their leashes 
green gold and blue, as they 
play maypole with his legs. 

A crowd of the curious gathers 
to see the singular sight 
he greets each with a smile 
a nod, and a look that says 
"I know, I understand. " 

The dachshunds strain and tumble 

and jump and yip and lick 

each hand reaching out to 

touch their blemishless brown coats. 

For awhile the crowd grows 

and then it wanes 

until he stands alone once more 

the dachshunds tug their message to him 

and he walks away. 

Thank you, 
David M. Frye 

Green Resident Frightened 

Dear Editor, 

I spent another sleepless night last night. But as I lay awake 
at 4 a.m., I was suddenly faced with the reality that someone 
was quietly turning the door knob, trying to get into my 
room. I sprang up in bed — eyes glued to the door and heart 
pounding so loudly I thought my neighbors could hear it. 
Thank God my door was locked! 

Although I only heard one person at first, the episode had 
apparently been repeated along the hall and by now more 
people were awake, aware of what was happening. A brave 
person finally went to her door and said something, which 
prompted the guys to leave. I was actually kind of relieved to 
learn it was only Kalo, up to their usual dirty tricks. 

My point is this: the back doors of Mary Green are so ac- 
cessible that anybody (and I do mean anybody) can easily 
break into the dorm with minimal effort. Does anyone re- 
member the street bum who was found several mornings 
sleeping in the coed lounge? It seems that incidents such as 
these have occured many times. 

After many complaints by students, Dean Yuhas and Chief 
Heisey agreed that we needed stronger security to keep out 
unwanted visitors. Our old wooden back doors were to be re- 
placed with steel doors, as on Silver, by the fall of 1980. Now, 
two years later, the handles have been taken off the old doors, 
but there has not been the slightest indication that the steel 
doors will ever be installed. 

So it was "only Kalo" — this time. It might not have been. 
Knowing that the "Flasher" is again on campus, can you 
imagine the kinds of horrible thoughts that were racing 
through my mind as I sat shaking, watching and listening as 
someone tried to open my door? 

A very concerned resident 
of 3rd floor Mary Green 



Director - cont. from p. l 

ships in student activities and 
related areas at the University 
of Connecticut and Manches- 
ter Community College, she 
began working as the Coordin- 
ator of Activities, Social and 
Recreational at the University 
of Maine-Farmington. 

When she begins work in 
June, Reihl will report to Mar- 
quette, but she will be basical- 
ly independent. While working 
with students and student 
groups, she will suggest, 
advise, and help create. Her 
duties as Director of Student 
Activities include the develop- 
ment of a full activities calen- 
dar. Acting as a resource for 
all students, she will be on 
campus evenings and 
weekends. 

Reihl claims she is mostly 
an "idea person." She prefers 
to come up with a lot of ideas 
and figure which one works 
best. She will depend on the 
students to make decisions and 
experiment with possible 
solutions. She stated, "I have 
a lot to offer, and the students 
have a lot to offer me." 

When asked how she felt 
about coming to the Valley 
this summer, she chose two 
words, "excited" and "enthu- 
siastic." 

Ms. Reihl will be on campus 
Friday, April 23; an informal 
social hour will be planned so 
that both students and faculty 
can welcome her to the 
college. 

New Religion, 
Music Programs 

This week, the Department 
of Religion and the Depart- 
ment of Music announced new 
programs for their majors. 

According to Dr. Robert C. 
Lau, Music Department chair- 
man, a Bachelor of Music de- 
gree will replace the present 
Bachelor of Arts degree in per- 
formance. 

The program, which will go 
into effect in 1983, will add 
four courses in pedagogy 
and literature to the present 
requirements. 

Lau, calling the present 
B.A. a "misnomer" said, "I 
think that if a serious music 
student sees that we are giving 
a more prestigious degree 
(such as the B.M.), it may 
attract more students to our 
school. 

Dr. Perry Troutman, pro- 
fessor of religion, will act as 
advisor for a new program in 
Christian Education. The 
program, which will get under- 
way in the fall, is available as a 
concentration in both the 
Department of Education and 
the Religion Department. 



pg. 3 THE QUAD Friday, March 26, 1982 



NEWS NOTES 

Phi A Ipha Epsilon Pew Grant 



Twenty-nine members of 
the Class of 1982 and two for- 
mer LVC graduates will be in- 
ducted into the Society of Phi 
Alpha Epsilon during the 
March 30th Chapel Convoca- 
tion program. 

To be eligible for election in- 
to the academic honor society, 
a student must have a cumula- 
tive GPA of at least 3.50 and 
at least 60 resident academic 
semester hours credit by date 
of graduation. 

Senior inductees are Robert 
Alan Neubert, Rebecca Jean 
Newcomb, Carol Sue Nixon, 
Joan Louise Richwine, Denise 
Louise Achey, Miriam Shaub 
Auker, Lynda Gail Bender, 
Kenneth William Breitenstein, 
Colleen Ann Crammer, Tracy 
Lynn Daniel, Beth Lynn 
Dickinson, Delane Keene Gar- 
linger, Michael Fred Gross, 
Glenn Allen Hafer, Donna 
Claretta Kreamer, Judy Kay 
, Landis, Tracy Lynn Lippi, 
Roseann Madeline McGrath, 
Donna Sue Obetz, Patricia 
lone Pletcher, Richelle Kaye 
Porter, Daniel Allen Reppert, 
Ernest Todd Richardson, 
Victoria Lynn Shaw, Barbara 
Jan Strock, Elizabeth Yao- 
Hwa Sung, Linda Lee Texter, 
Steven Michael Troy and 
James Maurice Welkie. 

The former LVC graduates 
are Mark Alan Hornberger 
and George Paul Moser. 



Lebanon Valley College is 
the recipient of a $150,000 
grant from The Pew Memorial 
Trust, administered by The 
Glenmede Trust Company of 
Philadelphia. The grant will be 
applied to construction of the 
college's Garber Science 
Center, which is expected to be 
completed in the fall of 1982. 

"We are pleased to receive 
this grant from The Pew 
Memorial Trust," said Robert 
M. Wonderling, LVC 
executive director of 
development and college 
relations. 

Helping Hands 

Gamma Sigma Sigma and 
Alpha Phi Omega will sponsor 
Helping Hands Weekend at 
the Lebanon Valley Mall on 
April 1,2 and 3. The carnival 
will liven up the mall with dif- 
ferent types of games and en- 
tertainment. 



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Gamma Sigma Sigma and 
Alpha Phi Omega, which are 
both service organizations, 
will donate the money raised 
to Lebanon-Lancaster Special 
Olympics. 

Special Olympics are de- 
signed to help or aid the retarded 
or severely learning disadvan- 
taged people of all ages through 
sports events patterned after 
the Olympics. These Olympics 
events are on district, state, 
and national levels. 

Games will be in action 
throughout the weekend with 
good prizes for the winners. 
The games are for preschool 
children to adults. Likewise, a 
bake sale will be going on the 
whole weekend. 

The schedule is: 

Friday: 
6:30 p.m. - An auction com- 
plete with an auctioneer. 
Used items from home have 
been brought by students to 
be bid on. 

8:00 p.m. -H.LS. Concert. 
Saturday: 

10:00 a.m. - All Girl Dixie- 
land Band. 

2:00 p.m. - LVC Jazz Band. 
5:00 p.m. - Two Barbershop 
Quartets. 

7:00 p.m. - Fashion Show. 
8:00 p.m. - Raffle. The raffle 
is for a black & white T.V., 
a hand-crocheted afghan, a 
clock-radio, a Hess's Gift 
Certificate, and several 
Consolation Prizes. 



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More Letters 



Lunch Line Lament 



Dear Editor: 

How many of you have spent over 50 minutes in the lunch 
line? On Wednesday, March 24, seven other students and I 
did. Not only was it very annoying to stand in line that long, 
but I was also late for class by 15 minutes. This not only 
caused embarrasment, but the professor chewed me out 
because I walked in during the lecture. Since this is not the 
first time that I have spent a lot of time in the lunch line, I 
question why it happens, and who is responsible. Is it really 
necessary to spend close to an hour in line for meals? 

Half the problem comes when people start cutting in line 
because the lines are too long. Mind you, I too cut in line, but 
if I didn't cut, I would be late for all my 1:00 classes. Why 
can't another line be opened for a short time to ease the mass 
of people in the two normal lines? The use of another line 
during these times would alleviate some of the cutting because 
the lines would not be so long that the only way to be on time 
to class is to cut. 

It is true that Mr. Michaels is saving us money by running a 
tight ship, and I commend him on that. But if he is smart 
enough to beat inflation, why is he not smart enough to 
recognize that there is a problem with the lines and do some- 
thing about it? This problem would seem simple compared to 
inflation. I think he should be a little more concerned with 
getting students through the lines faster than he is with the 
portion you are allowed to have on your plate. 

Will something be done about the lines? Probably not. 
When it comes to student problems such as this, responsibility 
seems to run low. I guess we will all have to bear with it and 
hope that our professors don't take action because we are 
constantly late for class. 

Signed, 
A Concerned Student 

Survey Cooperation Request 

Dear Editor, 

As an intern for the Public Relations Office, I recently cir- 
culated a survey concerning LVC Recruitment literature to all 
resident and commuter students. The purpose of the surveys 
was to give students the opportunity to critique the catalog 
and brochure with regard to their overall truthfulness and 
accuracy. 

Unfortunately, after allowing a ten-day response period, 
only 44 of the 817 surveys sent out were returned. Needless to 
say, I was very disappointed at the relatively small turnout. I 
think what we have here at LVC is a general state of apathy! 
Students complain about the college and want improvements 
to be made, but when given the opportunity to have some 
concrete input, most will do nothing. 

As with the purpose of any survey, the Public Relations 
Office and the Administration want to be made aware of 
student opinion. The knowledge gained from survey results 
can then be utilized to make improvements, 
recommendations, etc. Successful improvements cannot be 
made unless everyone makes an effort to do his or her part! 

It's too late now for students to complete the first survey, 
but I hope everyone will make a better effort with the second. 
Thank you, 
Janet Jacobs 



ANNVILLE OFFICE 



0Q Lebanon Valley 

EI0 National Bank 



Member F.D.I.C. 



pg. 4 THE QUAD Friday, March 26, 1982 



Rainbow Preview 



Administration Reacts to Frey, continued from page 1 



by Gloria Pochekailo 

If you would like a taste of 
romance, fantasy, intrigue, 
reality, comedy and Irish folk- 
lore all wrapped-up in dancing 
and covered with music, 
Finian's Rainbow may be just 
what you need. This fantasy 
musical is now in the makings 
and will be performed publicly 
on the weekends of April 16- 
18 and 23-25, in the College 
Center's Little Theater. 

The story opens with Finian 
McLoneigan, a native of 
Ireland played by Tom Myers, 
who has found a way, or so he 
thinks, to get rich in America. 
His daughter Sharon, played 
by Jenni Kohler, is aware of 
her father's intentions to get 
money for her, but she agrees 
to move to the United States. 
They settle down in Rainbow 
Valley, a town in the state of 
Missitucky, which is near Fort 
Knox. 

Finian believes that the 
source of America's wealth is 
the radiation given off by Fort 
Knox. This radiation affects a 
piece of gold, increasing its 
value if it is planted near Fort 
Knox; this allows any man to 
become a millionaire. Finian's 
gold, which he intends to 
plant, has been ambushed 
from an Irish leprechaun. 



MUSIC'S 
ARCO 

Main & White Oak, 

Annville 
867-1161 838-4663 

AAA Service 
State Inspection 
Mon. thru Fri. 8-5; 
Sat. 8-12 



This gold also contains the 
magical power of granting 
three wishes to the mortal who 
holds it. The leprechaun 
comes in pursuit of his gold, 
issuing warnings of 
destruction. Just as Sharon 
captures a boy for her heart, 
and some money for her 
purse, which is the "rainbow" 
her father promised her, the 
leprechaun's warnings mater- 
ialize and cause humorous 
havoc. The role of Woody 
Mahoney, Sharon's love, is 
portrayed by Mark Wagner, 
and Woody's sister Susan, by 
Jill Herman. 

Wallace Umberger directs 
this comedy — musical, with 
Richard Gates as his assistant. 
Musical director, Jeffrey 
Riehl, and producers Darlene 
Miller and Bryan Hartman are 
working hard to make this 
musical a memorable 
experience for all viewers. 
Because of the amount of 
dancing, Richard Wilson, a 
professional choreographer, 
was hired; he is well-known 
for founding many dance 
ensembles across the state. 

Practices are running very 
smoothly and no major 
problems have arisen. 
According to Umberger, 
director, this performance 
should be one of the best 
Lebanon Valley will see, "The 
cast is excellent and always 
well-prepared... I think they 
are working on a very profes- 
sional level." Umberger 
enthusiastically adds, "We're 
on our way to having a good 
show!" 

The price of tickets is $3.50, 
regular admission, and only 
$1.00 on Sunday nights for 
students. 




Alpha Phi Omega and 
Gamma Sigma Sigma of 
LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 

present the 9th annual 

HELPING HANDS WEEKEND 

April 1-3 
LEBANON VALLEY MALL 

Games, food, raffle 

dunking booth, entertainment 

LVC Jazz Band, 

aUCtiOn(Friday-6:30 P.M.) BENEFITS 

PA. AREA SPECIAL OLYMPICS 

Come on out and have 
a great time! 

It's for a good cause, too! 



grams during the 1983-84 aca- 
demic year. 

When asked whether 
holding off on implementing 
the proposed major is the 
same as having it "turned 
down by the President," as 
stated in the newsletter, Frey 
answered, "I think so, when 
time is of the essence." 

"It puts a business depart- 
ment at a significant, competi- 
tive disadvantage not to have a 
computer program," he 
continued. 

Dean of Admissions 
Gregory Stanson was the first 
to receive an indication of the 
newsletter's effects. On Tues- 
day, March 16, he received a 
telephone call from an 
alumnus whose daughter is 
enrolled here for next year. 
The alumnus wished to know 
what the two passages of the 
newsletter meant. 

Stanson had not seen the 
newsletter before receiving the 
telephone call. Since then, 
Stanson has prepared a 
response. On Monday, March 
22, he said, "We are mailing a 
letter this morning to all 80 of 
the Alumni Ambassadors 
apprising them of the 
situation." 

In an interview, Stanson ob- 
served, "Dr. Frey has done 
many positive, constructive 
things to enhance the Depart- 
ment of Business 
Administration. That's what 
surprises me so much about 
the letter. A good deal of the 
good he's done has been un- 
raveled by the newsletter." 

Stanson outlined additional 
actions the College is taking in 
response. "There will be a per- 
sonal letter going out this week 
to all the prospective students; 
this will be signed by all of the 
other seven members of the 
department. The other seven 
gentlemen who remain will be 
phoning those students." 

Frey has received no tele- 
phone calls from prospective 
students or alumni concerning 
the newsletter. "To me that in- 



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dicates there is not a great deal 
of concern." 

Frey is still the Chairman of 
the Department of Business 
Administration. Reed said 
however, "I've asked that he 
not be involved in advising 
new students or pre-regis- 
tering, and he has agreed. In 
all other duties he is still the 
chairman, and I expect to be 
working with him for the rest 
of the year." 

Stanson observed, "Of the 
faculty members outside of the 
Department of Business Ad- 
ministration, anger and shock 
would sum up their reaction. 
They're all hard-pressed to 
understand why." 

"I am just very sorry and 
surprised this happened," 
Stanson continued. "I am very 



disappointed at Dr. Frey. 
However, I think we need to 
pick it up and go from here. 
The business program will 
continue to be strong and do a 
first-rate job." 

Reed concluded, "While I 
will always be grateful to Dr. 
Frey for the improvements he 
has fostered in the Department 
of Business Administration, I 
regret that he has chosen to 
leave the College. The Col- 
lege's commitment to 
business-related programs re- 
mains strong, and with the ac- 
tive assistance of the other 
members of the department, 
we can surely survive the de- 
parture of one individual." 

Frey said, "My concern is 
for the kids, in the final 
analysis." 



Educational Center 



i OUTSIDE N T Stilt OU I0U (DEI (00 223 11(2 



Room Sign-Ups Scheduled 



On March 24, Dean of Students George Marquette released 
information concerning room sign-up for 1982-83. Room 
contracts will be distributed by March 29. 



Room sign-up for males 
Tuesday, April 13 
7:45-11:30 a.m. 
1:00-4:00 p.m. 



Wednesday, April 14 
7:45-11:30 a.m. 
1:00-4:00 p.m. 
Thurday, April 15 
7:45-11:30 a.m. 
1:00-4:00 p.m. 



MEN 

: All present Juniors. All students 
who wish to retain their present 
rooms. NOTE: This is the only 
day the present rooms can be 
held, so all students who want to 
keep their present room MUST 
sign-up on Tuesday. 
All present Sophomores changing 
rooms. 

All present Freshmen changing 
rooms. 



A room deposit of $50.00 must be paid in advance of room 
sign-up. Also, all students must bring a signed room contract 
and the receipt for the $50.00 deposit to room sign-up. 



Room sign-up for females 
Monday, April 19 
8:30-11:30 a.m. 
1:00-4:00 p.m. 



Tuesday, April 20 
7:45-11:30 a.m. 
1:00-4:00 p.. 
Wednesday, April 21 
7:45-11:30 a.m. 
1:00-4:00 p.m. 
Thursday, April 22 
7:45-1 1:30 a.m. 
1 :00-4:00 p.m. 



WOMEN 

All present students who wish to 
retain their present rooms. 
NOTE: This is the only day 
present rooms can be held, so all 
students who want to keep their 
present rooms MUST sign-up on 
Monday. 

All present Juniors. 



All present Sophomores. 



All present Freshmen. 



A room deposit of $50.00 must be paid in advance of room 
sign-up. Also all students must bring a signed room contract 
and the receipt for the $50.00 deposit to room sign-up. 
Room contracts will be distributed by March 29, 1982. _ 



pg. 5 THE QUAD Friday, March 26, 1982 



Sample and 
Reed Answer 
Students' 
Questions 



Business Administration 
department students asked 
questions and aired their griev- 
ances in a special meeting 
Monday. President of the Col- 
lege Frederick Sample, Dean 
of the Faculty Richard Reed 
and Dean of Admissions Greg- 
ory Stanson attended the meet- 
ing. 

Sample called the meeting to 
clarify the situation involving 
Dr. Ralph Frey and to issue a 
statement on the matter. (The 
full text of Sample's remarks 
is reprinted on page 6.) The 
bulk of the meeting centered 
on Frey, his contributions to 
the department, and his recent 
actions. 

Sample spoke first, reading 
his prepared statement, then 
answering questions from the 
crowd of about 170 students 
that had assembled in the 
Chapel lecture hall. Sample 
said no official action had 
been taken against Frey as a 
result of the newsletter, or 
anything else Frey had done to 
date. 

When asked by students 
where they could get a copy of 
the newsletter, Sample sug- 
gested they ask Frey for a copy 
since he had made it public. 
He also said the college is 
making no efforts to retain 
Frey. 

During Sample's comments 
a considerable amount of pro- 
Frey sentiment emerged from 
the assembled students. When 
students asked why Frey was 
not present at the meeting, 
Sample replied that he had not 
been invited. At the end of the 
questions and answers, 
Sample left the room in order 
to insure freer discussion. 

Dean Reed then took the 
floor and clarified a few points 
made by Sample. He stated 
that Sample had called the 
Meeting because he felt he had 
°een publicly attacked and 
Wanted a public forum in 
jyhich to answer. He said that 
. Dr. Frey's accusations are 
Just not true." 

Reed and Stanson answered 
questions, then turned the 
Meeting over to the faculty of 
he Business Administration 
de Partment. The faculty 
Ambers expressed their regret 
atl d pledged that the improve- 
ments in the department 
J°uld not suffer as a result of 
^ey's departure. 



ALL PENNSYLVANIA COLLEGE COMPUTER MATCHUP 
MEET SOMEONE NEW THIS SPRING 

Would you like to meet someone new this spring? Answer the following questions and you will be matched 
with ten other Pennsylvania College students of the opposite sex. Each person who participates will receive a 
letter (in approximately two weeks) which consists of the names, addresses, and ages of ten Pennsylvania 
College students who you are most compatible with. Send your answer sheet and $5 to: 

ALL PENNSYLVANIA MATCHUP 

20560 Orchard Road 



5. 



6. 



10. 



Are you: 
1. Male 



2. Ft 



lit 



I wish to be matched with: 

1. Asians 

2. Blacks 

3. Spanish 

4. Whites 

5. Does not matter 

How tall are you? 

1. Short 

2. Medium height 

3. Tall 

4. Very tall 

How tall do you prefer a date 
to be? 

1. Short 

2. Medium height 

3. Tall 

4. Very tall 

What is the color of your 
hair? 

1. Dark 

2. Brown 

3. Red 

4. Blonde (light) 



you 



What color of hair do 
prefer a date to have? 

1. Dark 

2. Brown 

3. Red 

4. Blonde (light) 

You consider yourself: 

1. Calm, cool, always 
control. 

2. Alive, full of fun. 

3. Quiet and sensitive 

4. None of these. 

People say I am: 

1. Very good looking 

2. Better than average 

3. Average 

4. Less than average 



9. I would rate my sex appeal: 



12. What kind of music do you 
most like to listen to? 

1. Pop 

2. Country 

3. Jazz 

4. Rock 

13. How important is it to you to 
have a lot of money (wealth) 
someday? 

1. Very important 

2. Moderately important 

3. Somewhat important 

4. Not important 

14. What size family would you 
want to have? 

1. No children 

2. One or two children 

3. Three or four children 

4. Five or more children 

15. In regard to world issues, I 
am: 

1. Very interested 

2. Moderately interested 

3. Slightly interested 

4. Not interested 



16. 



17. 



Ter 

Eight or nine 
Six or seven 
Five or below 



What would you prefer to do 
on a first date? 

1. Go to a movie 

2. Have a quiet dinner 

3. Dance the night away 

4. Go to a concert 



11. Where would you rather 



18. 



19. 



20. 



21. 



A city 

The country 

A suburb of a city 

A small town 



FIRST NAME: 



When kissing I: 

1. Keep my eyes open 

2. Keep them closed 

3. Both 

4. Never paid any attention 

What is your opinion of most 
spectator sports? 

1. Like to watch often 

2. Like to watch occasion- 
ally 

3. Enjoy a few sports 

4. Not interested in sports 

What do you prefer: 

1. Republican 

2. Democrat 

3. Independent 

4. Prefer not to vote 



Does it bother you 
others smoke? 
1. Yes 2. No 3 



when 
Sometimes 



I find my horoscope: 

1. Interesting-check it often 

2. Amusing-check it occa- 
sionally 

3. Ridiculous-don't belive in 
it 

Of the following, I would 
rather: 

1. Ski in Colorado 

2. Sun in Florida 

3. Theater in New York 

4. Showtime in Las Vegas 



ANSWER SHEET 



LAST NAME: 



NAME OF SCHOOL: 



ADDRESS: 



CITY, STATE, ZIP 



Marysville, Ohio 43040 



22. Clothes and personal 
appearance are: 

1. Very important 

2. Slightly important 

3. Not important 

23. In regards to alcoholic 
beverages: 

1. "Love" to drink 

2. Drink occasionally 

3. Drink rarely 

4. Do not drink alcohol 



24. 



25. 



26. 



27. 



How intelligent are you? 

1. Very intelligent (genious 
or near genious) 

2. Above average intelli- 
gence 

3. Average intelligence 

4. Below average intelli- 
gence 

Physical attractiveness is: 

1. Very important 

2. Moderately important 

3. Somewhat important 

4. Not important 

Do you enjoy opera? 

1. Yes, very much 

2. Occasionally (once, twice 
per year) 

3. Once in a great while 

4. No 

What is your idea of a 
romantic evening? 

1. Candle-light dinner 

2. Sitting by the fire 

3. Watching the sun go 
down (a beautiful sunset) 

4. Gazing at the stars 

5. All of the above 



28. 



murderers 
the death 



I believe: 

1. All convicted 
should receive 
sentence 

2. Some convicted murder- 
ers should receive the death 
sentence 

3. Capital punishment 
should be eliminated 

I go to church: 

1. Seldom or never 

2. Once or twice a month 

3. Nearly every week 

4. Every week 



30. At a dance, I prefer to: 

1. Dance most dances 

2. Dance fast 

3. Dance slow 

4. Stand around and talk 



29. 



AGE: DZI 
PLEASE CIRCLE ONE 
Male Female 



QUESTIONS: 
ANSWERS: 



1 




2 


3 


4 


5 




6 


7 


8 


9 




10 


1 1 


12 


L3 





































1 4 


15 


16 


17 











L8 


19 


20 


2 1 











22 


23 


24 


25 




26 


27 


28 


29 


30 























QUESTIONS 
ANSWERS 



1 



pg. 6 THE QUAD Friday, March 26, 1982 



Transcript of Sample's Statement on Frey 



EDITOR'S NOTE: President 
Sample read the following state- 
ment Monday night to a meet- 
ing of Business Administration 
department majors. 

I believe all of us who daily 
share our College life under- 
stand and appreciate the intel- 
lectual benefit which results 
from strong disagreements 
that occasionally occur be- 
tween or among parties on 
campus. Whether the disagree- 
ment involves the Dean of the 
Faculty and the Chairman of 
the Department of Mathemati- 
cal Sciences or the President of 
the College and some members 
of the Senior Class, the 
content of it can be fairly and 
squarely evaluated by many 
people who hold differing 
opinions. Persons who are 
honest and interested in con- 
structive criticism are certainly 
going to respect differences 
which arise. They are surely 
going to value spirited 
argument. 

Most of our off-campus 
friends such as alumni, your 
parents, prospective students, 
and many others also under- 
stand our College as a market 
place of differing ideas. They 
understand that occasional hot 
arguments are paradoxically 
part of the unity which marks 
a strong, small, liberal arts 
college. However, everyone's 
appreciation of spirited 
argument is based upon some 
generally accepted principles. 
A few of these principles are 
honesty, goodwill toward 
persons, consistency between 
verbal expressions and 
actions. In sound debate and 



evaluation there is no place for 
falsehood or deception, for 
personal ill will, nor for saying 
one thing but doing another. 

With such thoughts in mind 
most people want to 
strengthen Lebanon Valley 
College in every ethical way we 
can. No department can be 
considered in isolation. No 
department can be neglected in 
the process of College 
progress. When there is little 
or no interest in strengthening 
our total campus; when there 
is falsehood or deception in 
discussions; when regard for 
persons is absent; and when 
discrepancies between what is 
said and what is practiced are 
evident; then there can be no 
effort to elevate the quality of 
our campus life. In my 
opinion it then appears to be a 
selfish pursuit of personal 
benefit rather than an effort 
for identifying problems to be 
solved or wrongs to be righted. 

Last Tuesday I was shocked 
and chagrined to learn of some 
practices which appear to be 
unethical and void of concern 
for others. They indeed appear 
to be lacking in total campus 
concern and consistency. I am 
not interested in tirades or 
petty behavior at this time, but 
I am interested in stating some 
facts which might help 
everyone in drawing his or her 
personal conclusions. 

The President of Lebanon 
Valley College is interested in 
and concerned for the success 
of each and every department 
of our Campus. 

At the time of the appoint- 
ment of the current Chairman 
of the Business Adminis- 



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tration Department some 
specific, personal commit- 
ments were made to him. 
These commitments were 
related to salary, tenure, and 
promotion. 

The only commitment made 
about departmental staffing 
was to assure an effort to get 
seven qualified persons for 
full-time service for the fall of 
1981 and eight persons for the 
fall of 1982. As you know, we 
took the full step to eight per- 
sons in the fall of 1981. 

The only commitment 
related to computer services or 
programs was to assure the 
fulfillment of our plans to up- 
grade our capacity. Again, as 
you know, we received a new 
11/70 last summer, and we 
appointed a full-time Director 
of the Computer Center. 

The personal commitments 
to the Chairman included a 
promotion in professorial 



rank and placement on tenure 
after only one semester with 
us. These commitments were 
fulfilled. These actions 
coupled with the fact of his re- 
ceiving the highest entering 
salary ever given to a new LVC 
Faculty member made his 
appointment a very unusual 
one. He accepted the appoint- 
ment in October, 1980, with 
his expressed anticipation of a 
long association with people 
of our College and with antici- 
pation of facing the challenges 
at LVC. 

You should be aware of two 
other facts. First, the Chair- 
man never discussed with the 
President any perceived unful- 
filled commitments until 
March 17, 1982. Second, the 
President received from the 
Chairman a signed 1982-1983 
appointment letter which cer- 
tainly indicates the Chair- 
man's being satisfied with the 



conditions of his appointment 
for 1982-1983. The signed ap- 
pointment letter was received 
by the President March 15, 
1982 under the date of March 
12, 1982, and after the 
Chairman had already 
verbally communicated his 
resignation to some depart- 
mental colleagues, to the Dean 
of the Faculty, to some of you 
students, to many of our 
Alumni, and to many of our 
prospective students. 

I fully recognize that the aca- 
demic life is of necessity some- 
times filled with ambiguity. 
Please know of my strong 
efforts to having made the 
foregoing statements as 
precise as possible. 



Frederick P. Sample 



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pg. 7 THE QUAD Friday, March 26, 1982 



Reed Outlines Middle States Evaluation 

LV Seeks Accreditation 



The College's efforts to at- 
tain re-affirmation of accredi- 
tation will culminate on April 
4 through 7, when a team of 
eight educators will visit the 
College. They will represent 
The Commission on Higher 
Education of the Middle 
States Association of Colleges 
and Schools. 

In addition, a two-member 
National Association of 
Schools of Music Team will 
concentrate on the College's 
music program. 

Dr. Richard Reed, Dean of 
the Faculty, explained the im- 
portance of seeking re- 
affirmation of accreditation. 
"We are evaluated so the con- 
suming public has some idea 
of what kind of a school 
Lebanon Valley is." The ac- 
creditation process also 
"exposes fly-by-night schools 
and helps keep good, 
legitimate operations up to 



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standards." 

When asked why the 
accreditation process is 
performed by educators, Reed 
responded, "Colleges ought to 
be in the business of policing 
their own standards. The alter- 
native is outside policing, i.e. 
the federal government." 

In January, Reed submitted 
to the evaluators the two- 
volume Report of the SELF- 
STUDY of LEBANON VAL- 
LEY COLLEGE, a library 
self-study, auditor's reports, 
budgetary items, admissions 
data, "teaser" brochures, the 
college catalogue, and a 
history of the College. 

Even though the MSA 
requires these materials only 
four weeks before the 
evaluation, Reed pointed out 
that the team members re- 
ceived them in January. 

Reed stated that "insofar as 
possible, the team members 
will have a good picture of the 
College before they get here." 

After studying the 
materials, the evaluators 
"come to confirm our 
assessments or their 
suspicions," said Reed. He 
added, "I'd be surprised if 
they found some things we 
hadn't already found," and 
assured they "will not be here 



on a spying mission. 

When the teams arrive here 
on Sunday afternoon, April 4, 
they will begin a busy schedule 
of interviews, conversations, 
and observations. Thev will 
meet with President Frederick 
P. Sample and Reed over din- 
ner, the officers of the Board 
of Trustees, the Curriculum 
Committee, the department 
chairmen, and a select group 
of representative students. 

"By Tuesday night, they'll 
have come to a good idea of 
what the College is like," ex- 
plained Reed. On Wednesday, 
the teams will meet with 
Sample, Reed, and a "rather 
large group" of people. 

Before leaving, the MSA 
Team will draft a preliminary 
report. Containing recom- 
mendations for improving the 
College, the report will be 
submitted to the Middle States 
Association, which will meet 
in June to vote on Lebanon 
Valley's re-accreditation. 

In closing, Reed remarked, 
"I like a very open process. I'd 
like everybody on campus who 
wants access to these people to 
have it." If anyone wishes to 
meet with evaluators, he 
should contact Dean Reed's 
secretary. 



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Monday thru Thurs- 
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to 4:00 p.m. Stop in 
at 260 Reily St., or 
call for information 
at 232-1901. 




HAIRCUTS ONLY 



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on Tuesday and Wednesday 
Appointments taken 
on short notice 
109 W. Main ST. Annville. PA 

Jean C. Bomgardner 
867-2958 



BOB'S Family Hairstyles 

35 E. Main St., Annville 867-2557 

Women's Precision Haircut $3.00 

Women's Shampoo, Cut, Style $5.00 

Men's Precision Haircut $2.50 

Men's Shampoo, Cut, Style $3.50 

Helene Curtis Permanent Wave $13.00 

(Includes cut & style) 

Frosting, Shampoo, Style $12.50 

Shampoo, Set or Blow Style $2.50 

HOURS 

Mon., Wed., Thurs., Fri. — 1 p.m. to 7 p.m. 
Sat. 9 a.m. to 12 noon Closed Tusday 
Appointment or Walk-In 




Crossword 



by Joe Bonacquisti 

DOWN 

1. Requests 
6. Horn noise. 

11. Unable to hear 

12. Harass 

14. Happy greeting 

16. Suffix meaning little 

17. Eastern U.S. 's sea (abbrev) 

18. Behold 

19. "Hello" in dog talk 

21. Prolonged unconsciousness 
caused by injury or disease 
23. Just cited (used in footnoting) 
25. The Babylonian goddess of 
fertility 

27. Ethnic separations 

28. Terrorists against Israel 

29. Stanley's nickname 

30. Pre-lawstep 

31. Not (comb form) 

32. 5,280 feet (abbrev) 

33. Bottomless pit 

37. Cause of death from narcotics 

38. Wine sediment 
40. Regret an act 

42. Also (archaic) 

43. Consume 

45. English assignment 
47. Presley's state (abbrev) 

49. The sixth note of the diatonic scale 

50. Plumbum (chemical symbol) 

51. Medicinal plant 

53. The stakes in a poker game; also 
the pet name for a cat 

54. Chubby child angel 



ACROSS 

2. The animal self in psychology 

3. Observe 

4. Cap 

6. Degree for an English major 

7. The talking horse 

8. For example 

9. Fish-catching water bird with an 

expandible bill pouch 
10. Fraud 

12. Beachside travelway 

13. Gnawing mammals such as 
hamsters 

15. Alternative offering conjunction 

17. Medical group 

20. 13th president of the United States 

22. Furry water-loving mammals 

23. Tax collectors 

24. Nocturnal flying mammals 
26. The oblique stroke between 

words or in fractions 
28. 3.14159 

30. Faucet with a bent-down nozzle 

34. Hard shelled, winged insect 

35. You 

36. Direction pointed by a metal 
Rooster on a barn 

39. Mature male deer 

41. To catch sight of 

42. Suffix meaning like or suitable 
44. Suffix meaning away, from 
46. Prefix meaning neither 

48. Companion of neither 

51. An exclamation of delight 

52. Element with 63 protons 
(chemical symbol) 



SUMMER IS COMING! 
AND A SUMMER JOB, 
TOO 

Help make a summer exciting for campers and 
build your resume for a future career in education, 
recreation or social service. Summer camp position 
open for cooks, business managers, counselors, 
waterfront staff and specialists in sailing, drama, 
archery, arts and crafts, bicycling, nature, indian 
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Write: Penn Laurel Girl Scout Council 

1600 Mt. Zion Rd. 

York, PA 17402 



pg. 8 THE QUAD Friday, March 26, 1982 




Teeing Off - Dave Nuyannes and Greg Monteith practice their shots for the upcoming golf 
season. Coach Gerald Petrofes feels a chief weakness may be lack of experience among some 
of his golfers. 

Robb Hits Two Homeruns 

Valley Romps Over Swarthmore 



Ron Robb blasted two home- 
runs Wednesday afternoon to 
lead the Valley baseball team 
to an 11-2 romp over Swarth- 
more in the opening game for 
both teams. 

Ed Donnelly pitched the first 
five innings to pick up the win. 
Bob Johnston provided 
middle relief help, and Herb 
Hutchinson wrapped up with a 
scoreless ninth inning. 

The Valley jumped off to a 
one run lead in the first when 
Frank Rhodes singled home 



Mike Groody, who reached 
base on an error. 

Robb put the Dutchmen up 
by four with his first homer in 
the third, following singles by 
Vaughan, Robbins and Rhodes. 
Two more runs in the fourth 
put the game out of reach. 

The Valley's final two runs 
came on Robb's second blast 
in the eighth after Rhodes had 
reached base on an error. 

Coach Ned Smith, obviously 
pleased with the win, cautioned 
that it is difficult to size up a 



season with one game. "I'm 
pleased that we beat Swarth- 
more so convincingly, how- 
ever," he said, "because last 
year we won by just one run. ' ' 

He added that so far the 
defense and pitching has been 
good, even in an earlier 6-1 
loss in a practice game to Eliz- 
abethtown College. 

The Dutchmen open league 
play Saturday afternoon in a 
home doubleheader against 
defending champs, Moravian 
College. 



Lacrosse Opens Season with F&M 



This past Sunday and Mon- 
day the LVC men's lacrosse 
team participated in two scrim- 
mages. Sunday they beat a 
Harrisburg lacrosse club 8-4. 
Monday they lost to Hamilton 
College 9-3. 

According to head coach, 
Bruce Correll, the team's most 
immediate problem is getting a 
higher percentage of goals out 
of the amount of shots the 
offense gets. "We're getting 
the shots from such players as 
Dave Hall, Tom McArdle and 
Scott Tennant, but we're 
going to need a higher num- 
ber of goals to win," said 
Correll. 



Crossword Solution 



The team's defense led by 
goalie Joel Ronco and return- 
ing players Rick Schoff, John 
Taddie and Rob McCallion 
looked impressive throughout 
the team's pre-season play. 
"This is a strength of the 
team," said Correll. "We held 
the Harrisburg ciud to only 
four goals, and even though 
we gave up nine to Hamilton, 
the defense worked extremely 
well. 

When asked about the 
team's overall performance 
during the scrimmages, 
Correll said that he was very 
pleased. He got a chance to see 
everyone play, and their 



ability has improved greatly 
over the last few weeks. 

Correll also stated that this 
year's team has good depth in 
many positions. Players such 
as Glen Hafer, Chuck Fischer 
and Ed Grant will be called 
upon to control midfield play. 



This Saturday the team 
opens its season against a 
tough F&M team at home. 
"Our game plan is simply 
good ball control," said 
Correll. F&M has done well in 
its pre-season play so the 
Dutchmen wil have their work 
cut out for them. 



Dutchmen Runners Open 
In Baltimore on Saturday 



The track team, under the 
coaching of Kent Reed and 
Joel Hoffsmith, goes into the 
1982 season with a long list of 
outstanding upperclassmen. 

The veterans include co-cap- 
tains Ken Breitenstein and 
Dave Kerr as well as Ken 
McKellar, Dave Moyer, Bryan 
Jones, Lyle Trumball, Eric 
Chamberlin, Mike Gadd, Ken 
Hendershot, Jurt Amlung, 
Deb Detweiler, John Naylor 
and Todd Dellinger. 

Among these team members 
are three or four people who 
have the potential to qualify 
for national competition in the 
NCAA Division III meet. 
Also, there is a good possi- 



bility that Ken Hendershot 
could repeat his All-American 
status in the javelin. Deb Det- 
weiler, who may be the lone 
female on the team, ranks as 
one of the best in the MAC in 
the women's javelin. 

This season the Dutchmen 
will have fewer dual meets but 
will compete in a, number of 
relays and invitational meets 
against larger schools. The 
team's first meet will be 
Saturday against schools such 
as Navy, Morgan State, 
Indiana State, Colgate and 
about twenty-two others in the 
Towson Invitational at 
Baltimore. 



LV Tennis Loses Opener 
To King's College, 7-2 



The LVC tennis team opened 
its season Wednesday after- 
noon with a 7-2 loss to King's 
College. 

The Valley's top-ranked 
player, Greg Goodwin, opened 
play with a 6-1,7-5 victory, but 
King's took all remaining 
singles matches. 



Curt Keen lost 6-1,6-4; Joe 
Rieg 6-3, 6-0; Randy Brown 7-6, 
7-6; Dave Barbush 6-1, 6-2; 
and Tony Meyers 6-0, 6-1 . 

The team of Keen and Rieg 
won its doubles match 6-2,6-3, 
but Goodwin and Brown lost 
6-2, 6-3 and Barbush and 
Meyers lost 6-2, 3-6, 6-1. 




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THE 

QUAD 



Lebanon Valley College 



Spring Arts Festival History - 



Seep. 5 



April 23, 1982 
Volume 6, Number 12 
Annville, PA 17003 



General Ed. Outlined 



Lebanon Valley College stu- 
dents will have an opportunity 
to discuss revisions of the gen- 
eral education requirements 
currently being examined by 
the General Education Com- 
mittee and the faculty. 

The General Education 
Committee, a committee of 
the faculty, recently presented 
its latest version of general 
education philosophy and 
goals to the faculty for discus- 
sion in a series of meetings. 
Students are invited to meet 
with the committee Tuesday, 
April 27, at 7:00 p.m. in the 
lecture hall of Miller Chapel. 

Arthur Ford, committee 
chairman, said, "We want to 
have the students' reaction to 
our ideas because they have a 



unique perspective on the sub- 
ject and because they will be 
directly affected by what 
happens to our general 
education program." 

The committee presented an 
earlier version of its proposal 
to the faculty and students. 
They then took suggestions and 
reactions from both groups 
and revised that earlier 
version. 

Following reaction to the 
present version and further 
consideration, the committee 
expects to bring a final version 
to the faculty for tentative 
approval at the last faculty 
meeting of the year in May. If 
the faculty approves, the 
committee will then begin 
work on a program to imple- 



Arts Festival Slated 



by Amy Hostetler 

Although this year's 
Spring Arts Festival will 
feature fewer performances, 
Steve St. John, coordinator 
for the 12th Annual Lebanon 
Valley Spring Arts Festival, 
Promises that April 30-May 2 
will be "the biggest weekend 
on campus." 

Opening ceremonies will 
begin on April 30, at 8 p.m., 
with a performance by "La 
Mer Mime and Mask Theatre." 

The number of events, 40- 
45, was lowered due to costs 
jnd what St. John called 
"overlaps." According to St. 
( J °hn, last year there were 
too many conflicts — con- 
flicts of sound and interests." 

However, Deb Lucas, pub- 
icity chairman, does not 
bel ieve that the number of 
J Ve nts will adversely affect the 
festival. "I think everything's 



really spread out, so that 
you'll be able to stay busy," 
she said. "The number of 
events "won't affect the qual- 
ity of the performances." 

The events fall into six basic 
categories: visual arts, dance, 
music, drama, poetry and 
films. A number of campus- 
related groups will perform 
for the festival's audience. 
(See p. 4 for a schedule of 
events.) Most are musical 
events; for example, the Jazz 
Band, a barber-shop quartet, 
Dr. Donald Byrne's bluegrass 
group, "Reunion," and the 
LVC Concert Choir will per- 
form. 

Other events include out- 
door art shows, the premiere 
of "Sandusky Brown," an 
opera written by Dr. Thomas 
A. Lanese, associate professor 
emeritus, and Edna Carmean, 
author of The Blue-Eyed Six; 
see Spring Arts, p. 2 



ment the goals. 

The outline of the General 
Education Committee's 
proposal follows. If any stu- 
dent wishes to see the complete 
proposal, he or she can do so 
by contacting Mrs. Michielson, 
the English Department secre- 
tary. 

Component I - Fundamen- 
tal Skills 

1. Communication. The 
liberally educated person 
should read English well and 
should write and speak clear, 
grammatical, and articulate 
English. 

2. Reasoning. The liberally 
educated person should be 
able to reason clearly and ef- 
fectively in areas outside his 
major field. 

3. Mathematics. The liber- 
ally educated person must un- 
derstand the language of 
mathematics. 

4. Information Retrieval. 
The liberally educated person 
should have a basic overview 
of how information is gather- 
ed, organized, stored, and re- 
trieved; of what information is 
accessible to him; and of how 
it may be located. 

5. Foreign Language. The 
liberally educated person 
should be able to read and 
speak at least one natural 
language other than his native 
language. 

Component II - Patterns of 
Knowledge 

6. The Past, the Present, 
and the Future. The liberally 
educated person should be 
acquainted with the principal 
milestones of human history 
as a means to appraise his own 
place in history and to realize 
that each historical event 
occurs not in isolation but 
with connections to precedents 
and the future. 

7. The Individual and 
see General Ed., p. 4 




New Quad Staff - Seated, Left to Right: David Frye, 
Sharon Ford, Amy Hostetler and Dawn Humphrey. Standing: 
Michele DePrefontaine and Jed Duryea. 



The Quad Announces 
'82-83 Editorial Staff 



Dawn Humphrey, junior 
English major, will head the 
Quad staff again next year as 
editor. 

Returning editorial staff 
members include Michele 
DePrefontaine as copy editor, 
Sharon Ford as features editor 
and Jed Duryea as sports 
editor. 

New members of the 
editorial staff are David Frye 
as news editor and Amy 
Hostetler as assistant copy 
editor. 

Rik Saltzer will return as 
advertising manager. 

Dr. Arthur Ford, Quad ad- 
visor, said, "I am delighted 
with our returning staff. They 
all did a fine job this year of 



continuing to turn the school 
newspaper into a respectable 
and respected voice for the 
students on campus. I particu- 
larly commend Dawn for her 
courage and her sense of fair 
Play." 

The Quad will lose its news 
editor, Mike Thomas, through 
graduation. Ford said that 
"Mike will be hard to replace, 
but we think we have a worthy 
successor in Dave Frye." The 
Quad will also lose its business 
manager, Jeff Conley. Ford 
said, "We've been fortunate 
to have had Jeff and Rik 
handling our business affairs 
this year. They don't get the 
credit they deserve. Without 
them there could be no Quad." 



pg-2 THE QUAD Friday, April 23, 1982 



tffiFMs 

The Unicorn Speaks 



THE QUAD 

Dawn Humphrey Managing Editor 

Miehele DePrefontaine Copy Editor 

Mike Thomas News Editor 

Sharon Ford Features Editor 

. Jed Duryea Sports Editor 

Jef f Conley Business Manager 

Rik Saltzer Advertising Manager 

Staff: Joe Bonaquisti, Vicky Bryden, Lynn 
Cornelius, David Frye, Amy Hostetler, Herb 
Hutchinson, Kay Koser, Tony Lamberto, Roseann 
McGrath, Mary McNamara, Darlene Olson, Ruth 
Robinson and Jud Stauffer. 

Arthur Ford Advisor 

THE QUAD is Lebanon Valley College's bi-weekly news- 
paper, providing the college community with up-to-date 
news* sports, and ideas concerning our campus, Any student 
or "faculty member wishing to contribute to THE QUAD can 
contact any staff member. 



Editorial 

A Meeting of Minds 

by Dawn Humphrey 

When the Middle States evaluators visited the campus a few 
weeks ago, they met with a group of randomly selected 
students to discuss the students' perceptions of the college in 
general, and the social life in particular. 

The evaluators got an earfull. Students expressed intense 
dissatisfaction with the social life and spouted off a long list 
of criticisms, ranging from the intervisitation and drinking 
rules to the ineffectiveness of student government. Predic- 
tably, most of the complaints centered around the attitude of 
the administration. Students said they feel that members of 
the administration, particularly the president and the Board 
of Trustees, are completely cut off from the day-to-day world 
of the students. 

The evaluators, speaking from the other side of the fence, 
challenged the students (myself included) to do something 
about it. "Why do you stand for it?" asked one evaluator. 
Good question. Why do we put up with it? Our tuition pays the 
salary of every member of the faculty and staff, including 
President Sample. So why don't we try to hold them ac- 
countable to us for a change? 

Why do we put up with it — the ambiguous statements, or 
worse yet, silence on important campus issues, antiquated 
concepts of campus life, and the rest of the little signals we get 
that tell us the President and the Board of Trustees do not 
know the students, or trust us enough to treat us like respon- 
sible young adults? Part of the problem is that both sides have 
stereotyped images of each other. Sample and the Board 
often see the students as a mass of radicals who must be kept 
in check, not as over 800 separate individuals, with individual 
dreams, hopes and aspirations for themselves and the institu- 
tion. Students often see the Board as a bunch of fuddy- 
duddies who want to keep them from having any fun at all. 
Granted, there is dead wood on both sides, but there are also 
a lot of bright, interested people on both sides. The communi- 
cation gap and the formal structure of the college keeps them 
from meeting each other. Have you ever spoken to a Trustee 
who isn't a student or a professor? 

We need to foster some sense of community between the 
students, the President, and the Board. The President is more 
alienated from the students than any other member of the ad- 
ministration. Students can make an appointment to talk to 

him in his office, but many are intimidated by the thought of 
venturing into the wood-panelled chambers of his office. 
Also, they may think they have nothing important enough to 
say to justify an appointment with such a busy and important 
man. The President, understandably, may not feel 
comfortable going into the dormitories, where who knows 
what he might see. 

The answer then is for the President and the students to 
meet regularly on common ground, such as the college center. 
Maybe one of the Wednesday night coffee hours per month 
could serve as a forum for the students to speak informally 
with Sample and a Board member or two. Only through this 
type of regular contact will an atmosphere of trust begin to 
develop. It's hard to trust and believe in someone you have 
never met. 



Dear Editor: 

I would like to submit a letter written when I was discour- 
aged over the confusion and disorder in my life. I can only 
believe that my world will fall into its proper place and... I will 
find myself: 

/ am lost. I am sure 
there is someplace 
I should be, but 
the yellow brick road 
is under construction. 
I am caught in an 
amazing detour. 

How interesting tho- 
the things I have seen- 
truly remarkable. 
Sometimes very wise 
and sometimes 
very foolish. 

The only thing that scares me 
is I do not even know 
what I am looking for. . . 
Just looking. And! 

I know! 

at some obscure point, 

some remote place 

and some magical time- 

I will find what I am looking for. 

It will strike me 

like a mystical revelation 

or spectacular achievement. 

There and then I will find 

courage and strength 

to sit and watch 

my world. . . the truth 

of my world 

unfold. 

I will find myself. 

I always believed that I was the only person who had not 
found purpose in life, wondering if I would have any ever. 
But, I have realized that the past has taught me a great many 
lessons, and as long as I keep experiencing new things, I will 
keep learning. Everything I do will be purposeful to my life. 

In writing this, I only hope that it will touch other people 
who will be comforted to know that they are not alone. 
Sincerely yours, 
The Unicorn 

Food Service Replies 

April 6, 1982 

Dear Concerned Student, 
(Letter to the Editor, The Quad, Friday March 26, 1982) 
Thank you for expressing your concern about having to 

wait in the lunch line longer than normal on Wednesday, 

March 24. 

Food Service immediately did some rechecking of past 
figures. We still came up with the same average figures during 
the heaviest participation time. 

On March 24, however, the entree was one of the more 
popular items which takes longer to assemble due to the 
separate steps involved and the opportunity for the student to 
make personal selection of each item. 

If you would like to know more about our operation, 
please feel free to stop by and talk with me at your con- 
venience. 

Thank you for your interest. 

David Michaels 
Director of Food Service 



Spring Arts - com. from p. l 

the Festival Five Road Race, 
poetry readings, and several 
dance companies. 

The process began last 
August, when St. John started 
work on the budget and atten- 
ded other art festivals. The 
Spring Arts Festivals received 
funds from various organiza- 
tions, such as the Pennsyl- 
vania Council of the Arts, the 
Lebanon Council of the Arts, 
monetary and in-kind contribu- 
tions from LVC, and the LVC 
Student Council. The festival 
makes additional income from 
entry and rental fees, T-shirt 
sales and the ethnic food 
stands. 

This semester, the commit- 
tees have worked on schedu- 
ling, building, and publicity, 
meeting at least once a week in 
April to work out final details. 

Lucas and St. John predict 
20,000 will attend the weekend 
festival. Although a large per- 
centage of the people will come 
from the campus and the 
Lebanon-Lancaster-Harrisburg 
area, Lucas said, "I think the 
reputation is getting out — it's 
(the publicity) reaching a 
larger area." 

Ten committees, composed 
of 25 students, community 
members, and faculty, run the 
festival. The faculty advisors 
are: Richard A. Iskowitz, Dr. 
Phillip Billings, Dr. Leonard 
Geissel, Jr., C. Robert Rose, 
Dr. George Curfman, Harold 
Ulmer and Carol Lennox of 
Public Relations and John Uhl 
of Media Services. The student 
committee chairmen are: 
Tracy Daniel, Dance; Karen 
Fuller, Ethnic Foods; Deb 
Lucas, Publicity; Julia Smith, 
Children's Arts; Steve St. 
John, Grounds; Judy Walter, 
Hogan, Films; Andrea Crudo, 
Arts; Rhonda Beekman, Crafts; 
Elaine Woodworth, Drama; 
and Bob Wilhelm, the Road 
Race. Dr. Billings is the poetry 
committee chairman. 

For a brief history of the 
Spring Arts Festival, see p. 5 

LV Spring Arts 
Door Contest 

On April 30 and May 1, the 
Quad will hold its first annual 
Spring Arts Weekend door 
decorating contest. 

All resident students are 
invited to decorate their doors 
in any way they see fit. On 
Saturday, May 1, judges will 
inspect the dormitories begin' 
ning at 5:00 p.m., and winners 
will be announced from East 
Stage. Judges will be looking 
for originality, complexity and 
organization. 

The winner will receive a 
ribbon and a photo of his door 
in the next issue of the Quad. 



pg. 3 THE QUAD Friday, April 23, 1982 




Where's Paul? - LVC vocalists warm up while waiting for Paul Anka to appear at the 
Hersheypark Arena. Anka finally arrived five minutes before the performance. 

39 L V Students Back Up Anka 



How often have you dreamt 
of being able to sing with a 
celebrity in front of over a 
thousand people? Well, for 
some of the students at LVC 
this dream has become a reality. 

On Tuesday, April 20, at 
9:00 p.m., 39 of our music stu- 
dents performed as back-up 



singers for the super-star Paul 
Anka in the Hersheypark 
Arena. 

How did this all happen? 
Fran Leone, the director of 
productions for Anka, 
notified our music department 
regarding his need for some 
back-up vocalists; the 



ANNVILLE OFFICE 



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810 National Bank 



Member F.D.I.C. 



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Women's Precision Haircut $3.00 

Women's Shampoo, Cut, Style $5.00 

Men's Precision Haircut $2.50 

Men's Shampoo, Cut, Style $3.50 

Helene Curtis Permanent Wave $13.00 

(Includes cut & style) 

frosting, Shampoo, Style. $12.50 

Shampoo, Set or Blow Style $2.50 

HOURS 

Mon., Wed., Thurs., Fri. — 1 p.m. to 7 p.m. 
Sat. 9 a.m. to 12 noon Closed Tusday 
Appointment or Walk-In 



following Valley students were 
selected: Denise Achey, Chris- 
tina Barger, Beth Cunfer. 
Charles Eddins, Mary 
Catherine Tierney, Richard 
Gates, Bryan Hartman, Jill 
Herman, Tootie Miller, Ricka 
Patterson, David Ramage, 
Erich Schlicher, Vicky Shaw, 
Holly Hanawalt, Richard 
Cole, Elizabeth Sung, Chris 
Forlano, Jeffrey Riehl, Keith 
Roden, Steve Weber, Lauren 
Weigel, Ann Buchman, Jon 
Heisey, Heather Walter, Pat 
Houseknecht, Laura Fowler, 
Carol Jordon, Gregg Klinger, 
Debra Patterson, Mary Secott, 
Wallace Umberger, Mark 
Wagner, Diane Detwiler, 
Mary Francis, Winston Gray, 
Elizabeth Gross, Allan 
Junggust, Terri Roach, and 
Donna Sauter. 

These students sang selections 
from Anka's library, as well as 
other popular tunes. 



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Finian 's Rainbow 
Sparkles Through 

Opening Weekend 



by Linda Texter 

Finian's Rainbow finished 
its first weekend run Sunday 
night in the Little Theater. 
However, the electricity gener- 
ated on stage compared to the 
excitement of an opening night. 

The curtain opened to a 
colorful and attractive set 
which depicted Rainbow Valley, 
Missitucky, the home of Woody 
and Susan Mahoney, played 
by Mark Wagner and Jill Her- 
man, and various sharecroppers 
and people. 

At the beginning of the play, 
the land is about to be sold 
unless someone can come up 
with the cash to pay for over- 
due taxes. The situation looks 
gloomy until Finian McLoner- 
gan, played by Tom Myers, 
drops the money from a tree 
where he and his daughter 
Sharon, played by Jenni Kohler, 
are hiding. 

Finian has secretly stolen the 
pot of gold from the rainbow 
in his homeland, Ireland, and 
Og the Leprechaun, played by 
Ray Myers of Harrisburg, must 
get it back to save the lepre- 
chauns and other fantastical 
beings. These are a few of the 
dilemmas around which 
Finian's Rainbow revolves. 

Tom, wonderfully amusing 
as Finian, turned in yet another 
fine performance on the LVC 
stage. He was ably supported 
by Mark Wagner and Jill 
Herman. Mark was perfectly 
cast and dazzling as Woody, 

and Jill brightened up the stage 
with her graceful dancing and 



sparkling personality. 

In a change of pace from the 
"sort of grandish" music, 
Karen Gard charmed the 
audience with a sizzling rendi- 
tion of "Necessity." Her razzle- 
dazzle voice was backed up 
beautifully by the tobacco girls. 
The first act closed with a lively 
chorus number. 

The well-polished chorus was 
endowed with many quality 
singers whose hard work was 
especially evident in the opening 
of the second act, "When the 
Idle Poor Become the Idle 
Rich." 

As a southern senator who 
is inadvertantly turned black, 
Allan Junggust was difficult to 
understand. Allan rjedeemed 
himself, though, in a rousing 
gospel number led by Earl 
Lambert, Winston Gray and 
Alpha Johnson as the Passion 
Pilgrim Gospeleers. 

The pit, under the capable 
hand of Jeff Riehl, was over- 
powering in the small ensemble 
numbers, but provided a good 
solid foundation for the 
chorus numbers and peppy 
dance numbers. The choreo- 
graphy was the highlight of the 
show. 

Director Wallace Umberger 
is to be congratulated on 
putting it all together with 
Finian's Rainbow. The strong 
cast, attractive sets, realistic 
props, colorful costumes and 
creative special effects provided 
the perfect atmosphere for the 
fantasy of Finian's Rainbow. 



Heffner Presents Paper 



John Heffner, associate 
professor of philosophy, 
recently presented a paper at a 
conference sponsored by Col- 
gate University and the Society 
for Values in Higher Educa- 
tion. His paper, entitled 
Ethical Foundations of 
Scientific Inquiry, was part of 



a session on Inquiry and the 
Liberal Arts: Challenges and 
Reformations. 

Heffner received certification 
in philosophy from the Uni- 
versity of Edinburgh in 1970, 
and the A.M. and Ph.D. 
degrees from Boston Univer- 
sity. 



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pg. 4 THE QUAD Friday, April 23, 1982 



7:00 
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SPRING ARTS 
SCHEDULE 



FRIDAY 

A Spanish Flair, Little Theater 
Opening Ceremonies, La Mer Mime and Mask 
Theatre, Lutz 

"Amarcord", Little Theater 
SATURDAY 

Screeving, Quad 

Rosalind Pace, poetry workshop, Faust Lounge 
Dave Rojahn, magician, Lutz 
LVC Jazz Band, East Stage 
Children's Tables, next to Blair 
Barbershop Quartet, South Stage 
Appalachian Dance & Music Ensemble, Little Theater 
Face painting, steps of Mary Green 
Karate demonstration, East Stage 
Rosalind Pace, poetry readings, Faust Lounge 
Moving People, children's dance workshop, gym 
LVC Clarinet Choir, North Chapel steps 
Dave Harris, guitar, by library 
La Mer Mime & Mask Theatre, workshop, Chapel 101 
Karen Bonner's Dance Ensemble, Little Theater 
Moving People, adult dance workshop, gym 
Market St. Band, South Stage 
Dee and Kendra, dance, gym 
LVC Concert Choir, Lutz 
Dave Rojahn, magician, East Stage 
Woodwind Quintet, South Stage 
Jazz Band II, East Stage 
"Sandusky Brown," operetta, Lutz 
& 9:15 "Citizen Kane," Little Theater 
SUNDAY 

SAI All- American Band, Lutz 

H.I.S., Christian rock, East Stage 
Dave Harris, guitar, Library 

KSC Performing Dance Portmanteau, Little Theater 
Green Blotter, poetry, Faust Lounge 
Sheridan St. Blues, South Stage 
Dave Rojahn, magician, Lutz 
Leonard Johnson, dance, East Stage 
David Stafford, music, Chapel 
Independent Eye, comedy, Little Theater 
Night Owl, band, South Stage 
Third Stream, jazz, gym 
Dave Rojahn, Magician, East Stage 
Closing Ceremonies, "Report on a Castaway," Lutz 
Barbara Barden Dancers, Little Theater 
Messiah Prophet Band, East Stage 
"On the Waterfront," Little Theater 



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General Ed. - com. from p. l 

Social Organization. The 
liberally educated person 
should be acquainted with the 
diverse cultures of our world 
and with patterns of social 
organization as a means to un- 
derstand how each individual 
is affected by these patterns 
and how these patterns are ef- 
fected by individuals. 

8. Science and Technology. 
The liberally educated person 
should be acquainted with 
scientific methods of inquiry 
and with some of the major 
achievements of the natural 



sciences as a means to under- 
stand the principal consequen- 
ces of the scientific perspective 
as it affects technology and 
society. 

9. The Individual and the 
Aesthetic Experience. The 
liberally educated person 
should be acquainted with the 
principal products of artistic 
expression and with the 
creative processes of aesthetic 
experience as a means to 
enhance the quality of his own 
critical judgment and his own 
aesthetic experience. 

Component III — Values 



10. Values and the Individu- 
al. The liberally educated per- 
son should examine major 
religious and/or philosophical 
value systems so that he can 
give an intelligibly ordered and 
rational response to his own 
moral commitment. 

Component IV - Physical 
Activity. 

11. Physical Activity and 
The Individual. The liberally 
educated person should 
experience sport as part of 
total physical fitness and as a 
means of developing life-long 
physical activities. 



Author Speaks on 'Victimized Children' 



Kenneth Wooden, author of 
The Children of Jonestown 
and founder of the National 
Coalition for Children's 
Justice (NCCJ), will speak at 
Lebanon Valley College on 
Tuesday, May 4, at 8 p.m. 
Wooden, who has done 
investigative work for CBS 
'Sixty Minutes' programs 
concerning child care issues, 
has lectured on 'Exploited and 



Victimized Children' 
throughout the country. The 
program is open to the public 
in the Little Theater of the 
college center. 

As a result of Wooden's 
writings and investigative 
work with CBS, the U.S. 
Justice Department invited the 
NCCJ to co-sponsor a national 
symposium on 'Exploited and 
Victimized Children.' In 



addition to major lectures, 
Wooden conducts classes on 
'Juvenile Justice,' 'Cults and 
Religion' and 'Power and 
Investigative Reporting,' to 
name a few topics. 

Because of the timeliness and 
seriousness of his topic, 
Wooden will share highlights 
of his new book, PREY- the 
Sexual Violence and Murder 
of Children, when he appears 
at LVC. 



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pg. 5 THE QUAD Friday, April 23, 1982 



Spring Arts Festival History Traced 




Spring Arts Festival - La Mer Mime and Mask Theatre 
will be the opening act Friday night for the Spring Arts Fes- 
tival. 



Not many people remember 
Don Frantz. He was a sopho- 
more at LVC back in 1971. 
People described him as 
having long, reddish-blond 
hair, sideburns, freckles and a 
perpetual smile. Don was a 
hitchhiker who met people all 
over the Eastern seaboard, 
and many of them became his 
friends. Most of all, Don was 
a dreamer. 

Although very few people 
on campus know who he is, 
what he did, or the types of 
things he dreamt about, every- 
one has heard of one of his 
dreams that became a reality 
right here on our campus: the 
Spring Arts Festival. 

In 1970, when Don was 
looking through a magazine, 
he saw an article about a 
spring arts festival at an area 
college. This idea was new to 
him, and it excited him so 
much that he started thinking 



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Sample Serves "Lundin" 
For Seniors and Faculty 



On Friday, May 21, the 
Class of 1982, the Faculty, 
Administration and Staff of 
LVC will attend a "Lundin" 
at the Quality Inn in Lebanon. 
This announcement came in a 
letter written by Dr. Frederick 
Sample, President of the 
College, on March 23. 

Sample stated in the letter 
that the combination lunch 
and dinner "will combine the 
purpose of our past separate 
dinners for Seniors and for 
Faculty, Administration, and 
Staff." 



Sample noted that the 
lundin is a result of several 
suggestions from various 
people, and of negotiations 
with Senior class officers Scott 
Hughes, Kim Hillman, Mike 
Goodman, and Steve St. John. 

Although some cutbacks 
will be made over last year's 
Senior dinner, Sample hopes 
that "The changed program 
will become an enjoyable new 
tradition for us." 

More formal invitations will 
be sent to those involved at a 
later date. 



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about how he could organize 
an arts festival for the people 
of Annville. 

Originally, he planned this 
festival v to be a community 
event, but upon examining the 
resources that the college had 
to offer, he decided to make 
the festival a joint project of 
both community and campus. 

By seeking the support of 
friends he made while hitch- 
hiking, interested professors, 
administrative personnel, the 
Lebanon Valley Council on 
the Arts, and local artists and 
performers, Don's plans 
began to develop. 

The first festival was 
scheduled for May 14, 15 and 
16 of 1971. A press release 
promised that the festival 
would be "one of the most ex- 
citing events of the year for 
lovers of the arts in south-cen- 
tral Pennsylvania." This festi- 
val was financially supported 
by the Pennsylvania Council 
on the Arts, the National 
Endowment for the Arts in 
Washington, D.C., and the 
Lebanon Valley Council on 
the Arts. 

The first festival was a 
success. Estimated attendance 
was between 5,000-6,000; and 
Don agreed to act as coordina- 
tor for the next year's festival. 
The program was filled with a 
variety of entertainment: 
everything from art and inter- 
pretive dance to folk-music 
and one-act play competitions. 
Many of the activities 
overlapped; the weekend was 
never at a standstill. 

In the following years, the 
program's structure stayed 
fairly close to the first 
festival's. The printed 
program warned that "All 
other happenings are up to the 
discretion of the artist, the 



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wish of the coordinator, and 
the aesthetic confusion of the 
audience." New performers, 
artists and activities became 
involved in the festival; and as 
the news spread, attendance 
gradually increased. 

The college newspaper, La 
Vie Collegienne, commented 
in its May edition in 1972, "A 
unique feature of LVC's Arts 
Festival is the encompassing 
involvement of and appeal to 
students, collegiate and high 
school, and community, 
children and adults." And in 
this same year, the festival was 
the only one on its level to 
receive more than $1500 from 
the state. 

In 1973 La Vie noted that 
"Activities were taking place 
all over the campus at the 
same time. While kids experi- 
mented with cornstarch in the 
Quad, a woodwind quintet en- 
tertained interested persons in 
the lounge of the college 
center." 

Today the Spring Arts Festi- 
val has blossomed into one of 
the most unique experiences in 
South-Central Pennsylvania. 
Student Coordinator, Steve 
St. John, predicts attendance 
to reach as high as 20,000. 

What began as Don's dream 
has developed into a tradition 
at LVC, and in the town of 
Annville. And the Spring Arts 
Steering Committee keeps this 
tradition alive by aiming to 
fulfill Don's original goals; to 
expose both campus and 
community to quality forms of 
a wide range of fine arts, to 
give area audiences the oppor- 
tunity to enjoy the talents of 
others, and to improve 
relations between the college 
and the community. 



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1-» I T T • /"> - I . It • I » 



pg. 6 THE QUAD Friday, April 23, 1982 




MIKE'S BEST - Lebanon Valley's Mike Best puts an extra effort into the long jump 
during a recent track meet on Arnold Field. 

Valley Track Team Ready for 
Weekend Penn Relays in Philly 



The LVC track team winds 
up their regular season this 
week at home against 
Albright, Muhlenberg and 
Moravian. 

So far the team has had a 
good season. They placed 
second in the Western Mary- 
land Relays, finishing second 
behind Susquehanna in the 
eight-team meet. Top finishers 
for the Dutchmen were Ken 
Hendershot and Kurt Amlung 
who took first place in the 
javelin relay. The team also 
finished in second place in the 
400 relay, the sprint relay, the 
shuttle hurdles, the 800 relay, 
the distance medley, and the 
1600 meter relay. 

In a tri-meet with Western 
Maryland and Juniata, LVC 

tied for first with Western 

■ ■ f - 



Maryland 61-61. Lyle 
Trumball's three first place 
finishes in the 1500, the 800, 
and the 5000 meter races high- 
lighted the meet. Other first 
place finishers were Eric 
Chamberlain in the high 
hurdles, Ken KcKellar who 
tied for first in the 200, and 
Hendershot on the javelin. 

In another tri-meet with 
F&M and last year's M.A.C. 
champion Widener. LVC 
finished third behind first 
place F&M and second place 
Widener. Trumball was a sur- 
prising first in the 1500. The 
400 meter relay team (Dave 
Kerr, Dave Moyer, Todd 
Dellinger, and McKellar ) 
along with McKellar in the 100 
and Hendershot in the javelin, 
placed first in the meet. 



Finally, the team placed 
third out of ten teams in the 
Messiah Invitational. The 400 
meter relay team broke the old 
stadium record of 43.19 set by 
Widener in 1979 with a time of 
43.12. McKellar also recorded 
the best time in the M.A.C. so 
far this season with a time of 
10.8 seconds in the 100. 
Second place finishers in the 
meet were Hendershot- 
Javelin, McKellar-200, Ken 
Breitenstein-400 intermediate 
hurdles, Trumball- 1500, and 
Chris Jasman in the 10,000 
meter run. 

The team will wrap up their 
regular season this week with a 
meet at Messiah, the Penn 
Relays on Friday, and their 
final meet, a quad meet at 
home on Saturday. 



Women's Lacrosse Team Aims 
For Thme Victories This Season 



The women's lacrosse team 
is currently Ifftkless. 

captain Sue Newman says, 
"Coach Harriger feels that we 
have a good shot of winning 
three of our remaining five 
games." Sue agrees and adds, 
"If we continue to improve 
and get that important first 
win, we will have the confi- 
dence to win the remaining 
games on the schedule." 



The squad has lost to Millers- 
Dickinson 18-6, 
F&M 18-2, Western Maryland 
16-5, and Widener 17-5. 

The remaining games on the 
roster include Gettysburg, 
Drew, Wilson, Johns Hopkins 
and Cedar Crest. 

Despite the scores, the team 
is improving, and is looking 
for its first win of the season. 



against Drew at home on 
Saturday. 

The leading scorers on the 
young and inexperienced team 
are Sheila McElwee with 10 
and Sue Newman with 6. 

Four out of the last five 
games are on the Arnold Field 
complex, Gettysburg, April 
21, Drew the 24th, Wilson the 
27th, and John Hopkins the 
29th. 




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LVC Lacrosse Team 
Takes Two Victories 



The LVC men's lacrosse 
team added two big victories 
to their record this past week, 
putting them at 2-4 with three 
games remaining this season. 

Against Millersville State 
the Valley's offense produced 
12 goals. "Overall the offense 
had a great day," said coach 
Bruce Correll. Tom McArdle 
led the team in scoring with 
four goals, Scott Tennant had 
three goals and three assists, 
and Chris McArdle recorded 
three assists. 

Out at Dickinson College 
the lacrosse team picked up its 
second victory by a score of 
13-9. According to Correll, 
this was an important confer- 
ence win for the team. "Our 
game plan was to open up our 
midfield attack and generate 
more offense and increase our 
number of shots," said 
Correll. More offense was 



exactly what the team got. The 
Valley's first four shots 
resulted in goals, three of 
which were fired in under a 
minute. 

Midfielder Dave Hall helped 
ignite the team's explosive 
start with a feed to Chris 
McArdle for the opening 
score. Hall also won the first 
10 face-off s of the game which 
kept the ball in Dickinson's 
end, and tied a school record 
by picking up 20 ground balls 
in the game. "The ground ball 
statistic is a very important 
one in a game, since it most 
often determines the winner of 
the game," said Correll. Hall 
also went on to score four 
goals and assist two, his best 
game ever at LVC. Tom 
McArdle contributed three 
goals, while Jack Raymond 
and Scott Tennant both had 
two. 



Women's Softball 
Competes as Club 



The LVC softball club, 
coached by Sue Maza, has 
competed against the varsity 
squads of Elizabethtown 
College and Cabrini College 
this spring. 

Although the club has not 
won a game so far, Maza be- 
lieves in her team's potential. 
"The more games we have, the 
stronger we get as a team. The 
girls play their positions better 
and learn to react to situa- 
tions," she said. 

The softball club consists of 
about 15 women,, most of 
whom have participated on 
high school teams or played in 
recreational leagues. Team 
members practice twice during 
the week and games are played 
on weekends. After two years 
as a club, a varsity softball 
team can be formed. "The in- 
terest seems to be there," ob- 



served senior Colleen 
Crammer. Other senior team 
members are Diane Sebright, 
Judy Herlich, Richelle Porter, 
and Karen Neiswender. 

"Next year looks good — we 
have a lot of returning players. 
Hopefully we will have fall 
training and some fund 
raisers," Maza said. 

The team has had to play 
most of their games away be- 
cause most established varsity 
teams don't want to travel to 
play a club team. "We have to 
thank Mr. Sorrentino for 
getting us some games. He's 
been very supportive of the 
club," Maza stated. 

The softball club will play 
one game on their home field. 
They face Cabrini College 
from Wayne, Pennsylvania 
there on April 26th at 4:00 
p.m. 



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